The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (08/08/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Intervals of clouds and sunshine. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High of 85.  “A”

SUNDAY
: Partly cloudy skies. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High of 88. “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog. 

We’ve written so many blogs over the years about how therapeutic dogs can be for people with physical, mental, and cognitive challenges.  I can’t count the number of times I’ve been moved to tears by the stories of human-dog relationships and the life-changing bonds that develop.

This week’s edition is one more of those stories, but it hits closer to home than all the others.  I have been blessed to know Rene Crow for over twenty years.  She & her husband have two lovely, young adult daughters both of whom they are very proud.   Mikayla, their older daughter, suffered physical & mental trauma in her late teen years and is working very hard to overcome the deep scars that were left.  Excerpts from her GoFundMe bio:

One day I found myself in a sexually abusive relationship with [an upperclassman] and was sexually assaulted in June of 2016. He tricked me into thinking that this was love and these are what relationships were about…  Just a few weeks after, the unspeakable happened. I lost my best friend to Suicide… It was very hard to separate us and on that day, my life shattered into a million pieces. 

 After making the decision to get some help, I was diagnosed with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), Major Depressive Disorder, and Severe Anxiety/Panic Disorder…  Through all that has been going on, I am so lucky to have family and friends that have dogs that love me to death. They know just how to make me feel better; with each one of them I have a special connection…  Every time my doctors would ask me what helps, what makes it bearable, my only response would be “The Dogs.”

Bailey and Mikayla 2
Here’s Mikayla with their family dog, Bailey

Enter Charlie.  According to Rene, “Charlie is a two-year-old German Shepherd rescue. He has been training to be a service dog for about 10 months and now is being specifically trained for Mikayla‘s needs. We leave for Indianapolis on October 18 and go through 9 days’ worth of handler training. Then he’s officially ours! Mikayla‘s been on the waiting list for almost a year and a half now, so we are super excited about this!  We are hoping this will allow Mikayla to begin working again, possibly going back to school, and living in normal life!!! It has been a rough road.”  Sweet Charlie is being trained by Medical Mutts.

Charlie
Here’s Charlie!

The Crow Family’s Go Fund Me page has made the $3,000 down payment on Charlie’s training possible.  However they are still a long way from the total $16,000 needed by the end of the process.  And here’s where our local Barking Lot readers could possibly help.

On August 23, the Milky Way Drive In here in Franklin is hosting a fundraiser to benefit the Crows.  $10 of the $40 carload fee goes to the Crows for Charlie’s training costs.  The movie is TBD, but you’re guaranteed a great time no matter what the choice!  If you haven’t had an opportunity to visit this amazing addition to Franklin Field, now is a great time!  If you are so inclined, you are also able to support her efforts directly through her GoFundMe page as well.

I’m happy to spread the word for this incredibly strong young woman, and thank you for your kindness and consideration.  I commented to Rene how phenomenal dogs are and she replied, “It’s absolutely amazing to me how a dog can bring Mikayla out of all the despair anxiety and panic.  This is been a long time coming [and we’re] so very thrilled!”
—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.
Lake Norman Dog Bark and Brew Weekly News! - Lucky Dog Bark & Brew

Navy pulls support of SEAL museum after video of dogs attacking man in Colin Kaepernick jersey.

ARL Boston caring for dog who had life-saving surgery after eating paper masks.

Time to open up one of our favorite files: Dogs are amazing!

An adopted 14-year-old girl is helping senior dogs find a forever home just like she did.

Michigan couple says they’ve trained detection dogs to sniff out coronavirus.

Coronavirus-sniffing dogs dispatched at Dubai Airport.

OPINION: Spare dogs in drug tests.

2020’s Most Pet-Friendly Cities.

This may be the craziest story ever posted on this blog.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

He is Batman.

Where is that beagle?

We close as we always do with our closing video.

First, dog rescued after chase on I-94. The video is in this article.

AND, Tom Turcich of New Jersey and his adorable pooch Savannah have walked over 18,000 miles through the United States, Mexico, Costa Rica, Chile, Italy, Turkey and dozens of other countries over the past five years. And he’s not done yet.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

Bailey and Mikayla

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (08/01/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Mostly cloudy.  High of 80.  “A”

SUNDAY
: Partly cloudy in the morning. Thunderstorms developing later in the day. High around 80.  Chance of rain 80%.  “A” in the morning. “D” later in the day.

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog. 

This week’s blog combines current events and new research, and of course, dogs.

America’s pandemic rages on, so testing continues hoping to identify symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers to reduce the spread of infections.

Tests now being conducted generally require swabs applied to the upper part of the pharynx, connecting with the nasal cavity above the soft palate.

A health worker prepares to collect nasal swab samples for COVID-19 tests at a mobile testing centre in Hyderabad, India,…

Another test (and it’s complicated to explain) is used for pathogen identification that has been helpful with treatment and prevention of many diseases.

These procedures can be time consuming and cost-prohibitive. Preferably the tests should be fast, reliable, and non-invasive. That’s where dogs come in.

We know dogs have an incredible sense of smell, 10,000 to 100,000 times as acute as that of humans.

“Let’s suppose they’re just 10,000 times better,” says James Walker, former director of the Sensory Research Institute at Florida State University. “If you make the analogy to vision, what you and I can see at a third of a mile, a dog could see more than 3,000 miles away and still see as well.”

It turns out that volatile organic compounds produced during respiratory infections can cause specific scent imprints that can be detected by trained dogs.

During the past several weeks there’ve been media reports about studies of dogs being capable of sniffing out the coronavirus. Here’s the latest study, conducted by researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover in Germany that was published in a respected medical journal late last week.

Eight (8) detection dogs were trained to determine between saliva samples from individuals who were infected with Covid-19 versus those who are not. When the dogs were correct they were rewarded with either a bit of food or a few seconds to play with a ball.

Dogs were presented with 1,012 samples. How did they do?  The dogs achieved an overall detection rate of 94 percent.

How did the detections break down?  There were 157 correct indications of positive cases of the virus, 792 correct rejections of negative cases, 33 false positive and 30 false negative indications. Again, 94 percent.

The dogs needed just five days of training until researchers believed they could adequately and effectively make detections. Researchers concluded their data showed that detection dogs can be trained in just about a week to discriminate between samples of people infected and non-infected by SARS-CoV-2.

The same cautionary note was made that researchers issued in all other dog studies I’ve blogged about. While the study was promising, further work is necessary.

But what’s highly significant is that this study confirms that dogs can detect the virus with striking accuracy, and these detection dogs need just a short thorough training period to become effective.

Finally, testing is quite expensive, costing hundreds, maybe thousands of dollars. But a trained coronavirus detection dog can screen a patient in under a minute at a minimal cost. That’s because the entire test only requires the dog, its handler, and someone documenting the results.

—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

Lake Norman Dog Bark and Brew Weekly News! - Lucky Dog Bark & Brew

Buddy, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in the U.S., has died.

Across the ocean, a dognapping crime wave.

WTH! Folks in Tennessee raised $11,000 for ‘a service dog for Ava.’ Then, the trainer threatened to take the dog back, lawsuit claims.

From the “Dogs are truly amazing” file.

‘An absolute miracle.’

Leo the 120-Pound Labrador Carried Down Mountain by Rescuers After Suffering Dehydration on Hike.

Therapy dogs helped a Wauwatosa teen through chemotherapy. Now Make-A-Wish is helping his dog become one.

Former Las Vegas shelter dog’s story featured in new book.

Internet rips $2K Bottega Veneta clutch. Read why.

The couple was walking the dog one morning, except…

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

A handout picture released by Wasdale Moutain Rescue on July 26, 2020 shows volunteers carrying Daisy, a 55kg St. Bernard dog down from Scafell pike, one of England’s highest peaks near Grasmere in northwest England. Photo: AFP

We close as we always do with our closing video.

Only one this week. 😦

Video is in this article:

Milwaukee woman and her dog beat pandemic blues with costumed walks.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/s1080x2048/116794361_10103576718754433_5121193329148544346_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=5b7eaf&_nc_ohc=pvubCQUzN_UAX_To7Vk&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=7&oh=9881b17b642fb4d9079266c4e3dc624a&oe=5F4B5185

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (07/25/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY: Partly cloudy. Very warm. High of 89. “B”

SUNDAY
: Partly cloudy early. A 50% chance of scattered thunderstorms developing after 3:00 pm. High of 91. “B”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

These are definitely the dog days of summer! Ninety degrees today and tomorrow? Good time to head to the lake. In this case, Lake Wisconsin.

Lewis is a good swimmer. Obviously Lewis can swim and loves to swim.

But not all dogs are alike.

Truth is not all dogs can swim. They have trouble staying afloat. They get tired. They have respiratory problems.

Let’s rank the canine swimmers.

Topping the list…

Ah. America’s favorite breed. The labrador retriever. Ideal for swimming. A thick waterproof coat. Webbed feet. Also include…

The Portuguese Water Dog.

Not quite at the top are any number of dogs that are a bit apprehensive but can be taught.

And then there are dogs that simply have difficulty staying above the water.

Top-heavy dogs. Again…

Without a flotation device that poor boy will probably sink right to the bottom. Not his fault.

Short legs…

Dachshunds and basset hounds.

Throw in hairless or dogs with fine coats because they get cold easily.

You can instruct your doggo to swim. Just get in the water with him/her.

Is it a good idea to toss your dog into the water for that first swim?  If you do, the dog will get scared and never want to swim again.

Go easy and slow. Practice walking into the shallow water then back out again so that your dog understands that it can get out if it’s too much.

Consider one of these…

Any dog that is lightweight or has short legs should wear a life vest or jacket.

You can always coax your dog into the water with something to play with.

Stay away from waves that might frighten.

And keep your dog leashed until he/she is able to swim unassisted.

“Water therapy is beneficial in a variety of different areas,” says Dr. Jonathan Block, Veterinarian and Owner at West Delray Veterinary in Delray, Florida. “From a preventative perspective, hydrotherapy is good for fitness, body condition, and a great source of aerobic exercise that is low impact on the bones and joints. It is a great tool to help your dog stay in optimal shape.”

Have fun!

—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

It’s hot! You’ve probably heard these before, but they’re worth repeating.

Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows. Also…

A Kansas dog went missing for days. Turns out, she had journeyed to her previous house in Missouri, over 50 miles away.

Racine Police K-9 dog Titan to retire.

The most important task for a PTSD service dog for veterans is this.

Service dog helps woman get through cancer treatments thanks to ‘super suit.’

The best hip and joint supplement for dogs.

Here’s Why Your Dog Knows When It’s Time For Food and Walks, According to Experts.

Why do puppies cry and whine?

Mackinac Island is a dog-friendly place.

“This is such an immense act of kindness.”

More than 100 dogs surprised a Wauwatosa dog-lover who has spina bifida for his seventh birthday.

Send Your Dog to Dodger Stadium as a Cardboard Cutout.

We haven’t had a naughty dog story in awhile. Here you go.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

The sniffer dogs being trained to detect the coronavirus.

2-legged poodle walks on hind legs after remarkable recovery: ‘The friendliest, happiest dog’

We close as we always do with our closing video. More than one this week.

First, we head to Utah…

 

Theo…

 

Question.

 

 

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

How about that Titan in Racine!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (07/18/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:  HEAT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 1 PM TO 8 PM. Heat index values 100 to 105 expected for all of Southern Wisconsin. Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat illnesses to occur. Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any circumstances. Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1. Partly cloudy. High of 92.  “B”

SUNDAY
:  Considerable clouds early. Some decrease in the clouds later in the day. A stray shower is possible. High of 87. “B”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Last month, our daughter Kyla’s smile wattage increased with the addition of shiny silver brackets on her top teeth.  Believe it or not she was actually looking forward to getting them.  She needed some “prep work” in the form of a palatial expander which was inserted in January.   While she realized it was part of the treatment process it didn’t look or feel like real braces.  The next phase was delayed because of, what else, the virus.  Finally, June 8th was THE DAY.  Despite an unusual new routine for arrival and appointment she was a trooper.  (We expected nothing less in all honesty.)

Admittedly it took some getting used to…  Traditional brackets on the top, a retainer that remained IN while eating on the bottom, and the palatial expander still cemented in place.  Eating was a new adventure for a few days and I wouldn’t have asked her to say “She sells sea shells by the sea shore” and expect any enthusiasm.  But the look on her face that afternoon speaks volumes…

Kyla Braces

While my childhood braces corrected a slight overbite, Kyla’s are working to fix a crossbite.  It’s a little more complicated than what I experienced and she’s likely to have a second round of them in high school.  She fully understands and is more than willing to have a lifetime of straight teeth with no complications of jaw problems and difficulty biting & chewing.

Now, it’s no secret that 2/3 of the Fischer Family want a dog with fierce desperation.  It’s also no secret that the 1/3 remaining pays the majority of the bills, including orthodontia-related ones.  Generally high costs related to dog ownership are one of the top three reasons Kyla & I haven’t won our arguments.  Yet.    But you just know that in the back of his mind he’s thinking that with his luck even our dog will need its bite corrected.  And not in that canine vs. mailman way.

While I certainly hate to admit he could have a point about an additional expense for Fido, he’s kind of right.  Dogs CAN need braces!  But then again, who could possibly resist the cuteness of a doggo with dental work? 
—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

South Carolina dog put down after testing positive for coronavirus: report.

Connecticut mayor sues Delta Airlines over dog bite.

Dog shows try to go on amid the pandemic.

Why this bad pandemic might be good for dogs.

Dennis Quaid says ‘animal abuse’ scandal on his 2017 movie A Dog’s Purpose ‘was a scam’.

Brainy dog owners are more likely to have badly behaved pets. Why?

Study: Dogs may use Earth’s magnetic field to take shortcuts.

The Ivy League of Seeing Eye Dog Schools. It’s elite.

Jennifer blogged about this a long time ago, but the news media has been reporting on it the past few weeks.

Yellowstone National Park’s famous lost and found dog featured in new children’s book.

COLUMN FROM AUSTRALIA: I applied to foster a dog, but a month into lockdown the entire nation had the same idea.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

Cookie the cockapoo jumps over a sea defence on the beach in west Norfolk. Photo: The Guardian

We close as we always do with our closing video. We have a few.

“If someone had to die, I thought it should be me.” Little 6-year old Bridger Walker’s story of heroism is one of the best of 2020.

The dog was euthanized, according to the Cheyenne Animal Shelter. The shelter said that Cheyenne Animal Control investigated the incident, as is the case for all animal bites in the city and Laramie County. At the dog owner’s request, the animal shelter provided humane end-of-life services to the dog.

News outlets are still talking about this item we shared with you last week.

And to the rescue again, in California:

And Watch Genius Dog Talk to His Owner in English Using a Sound Board With Dozens of Spoken Phrases.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (07/11/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Scattered clouds with the possibility of an isolated thunderstorm developing during the afternoon. High of 84.  “A”

SUNDAY
:  Partly cloudy skies. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High of 76   “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Check out these photos.

Simply put, the two dachshunds are different.

The second dog is Obie from Portland, Oregon. Obie appeared on the TODAY Show in 2012, weighing 77 pounds. That’s more than twice the size of an average dachshund. He’d make a return visit to the program after losing 54 pounds thanks to regular exercise and a high-fiber, low-carb diet.

The difference between the two pictured dogs goes beyond their weight.


San Diego Humane Society

It might be hard to believe. Then again, maybe not. But it seems overweight dogs are perceived in a negative way by veterinarians, even worse if their owners are overweight. That could have an impact on the quality of attention and treatment the dogs receive.

If that sounds serious it’s because it is serious. About half of all dogs in North America are overweight or obese. Dogs that weigh too much are at greater risk of all kinds of diseases. And they wind up in vets’ offices.

Knowing that obese humans confront discrimination, researchers at the Department of Psychiatry at the Perlman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania wanted  to find out if obese pets were also victims of bias.

So they conducted two identical online studies. One included 205 practicing veterinarians while the other had 103 veterinary students.

Again, all of them got the same instructions. Each was presented with one of four images featuring 1) either a lean dog and a lean owner;  2) a lean dog and an overweight owner; 3) an overweight dog and a lean owner;  4) or an overweight dog and an overweight owner.

Next, they were all asked to describe how they felt about the dog and owner separately, AND how much they liked the dog and its owner.

What did the researchers find out? Brutal honesty.

Both the veterinarians AND the veterinary students reported more negative emotional responses when the dog was obese. Specifically, that meant feelings of disgust, frustration, blame, and contempt. That’s how they felt about the fat dogs AND their fat owners.

So, how did that influence the analysis and treatment by these lovely folks in the white coats?

In the case of overweight pooches,  veterinarians actually admitted and reported that they liked the owners less than owners of dogs that weren’t fat. They did not believe the owners of fat dogs would adhere to their recommendations to help the dogs lose weight.

Proving the bias of the study participants, if the owners of overweight dogs were also overweight, the veterinarians and students concluded that it was the owners’ fault the dogs were fat because the owners obviously had poor food and health habits. And they were transferring their bad behaviors onto their dogs.

That’s bad enough. Because the vets and students jumped to this erroneous conclusion, they also completely dismissed from their minds that beyond eating there might be other factors causing  the obesity, and thus, also dismissed other alternative treatments that could be considered or administered that could actually be useful.

This research is damning to vets. How can you trust them? Apparently that depends on the size of your dog.
—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

The news isn’t always good. And we try to refrain from those stories, but this was a big one this week. Florida police identify 3 killed in dispute over dog.

Legislative candidate in Wyoming shoots neighbor’s dog.

Do dogs really see in just black and white?

Now you tell me.

OK Ask Amy. What about this one?

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

A dog carries a basket of bread from the El Porvenir mini-market as he makes a delivery on his own in Medellin, Colombia, July 7, 2020. Photo: AP 

A photographer’s inventive dog portraits show just how human-like our pets can be.

We close as we always do with our closing video. And we have a few that means they’re really, really good.

From FOX 6 Milwaukee:

“Nothing short of a miracle” in this next story from Coldwater, Michigan:

Next, beware of this scheme:

We do love a happy ending.

In New Jersey, Washington Township police Officer John Kuligowski uses a kayak to free a boxer/mastiff named Akela from pond muck on Wednesday  with an assist from Chief Thomas Cicerelle and Officer Dallas Overko on shore.

A neighbor saw the dog trapped in a pond and called police saying  the gray boxer/mastiff mix narrowly avoided getting hit by a car, headed for the pond and was stuck. Officers spotted the dog apparently tangled up in plants on the bottom and unable to escape, its head sometimes submerging in the muck.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (07/04/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Sunny. High of 87. “A”

SUNDAY
:  Mostly sunny. High of 89. “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

No mail today. So no dogs sinking their teeth into postal workers.

A few weeks ago I wrote about National Dog Bite Awareness Week. This week I have more since it’s an issue more serious than many think.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (you’ve heard of them, I’m sure) a whopping 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year in America.

Why should you care? You don’t even own a dog. Every dog you’ve ever known has been fantastic. So why be concerned? There are lots of reasons.

Kids get bit a lot. Most often it’s the age 5-9 crowd.

Who gets bit the most? The good folks trying to deliver your mail? Nope.

Over half of dog-bite injuries occur at home with dogs that are familiar to the victim.

You can’t take this lightly since dog attacks hurt everybody. How so?

As the number of dog attacks and subsequent injuries (even deaths) go up, so insurance payouts. That means higher premiums for liability AND health insurance, if you own a dog or not.

That’s according to the Insurance Information Institute that also reports that the average cost paid for dog bite claims nationwide was $44,760 in 2019, up from $39,017 in 2018.

The average cost per claim for dog bites nationally has risen 134 percent from 2003 to 2019 due to increased medical costs and increasing size of settlements, judgments, and jury awards to victims/plaintiffs.

Liability claims related to dog bites and other dog-related injuries cost homeowners’ insurers $797-million in 2019.

And we’re not talking just bites. Let’s say your dog knocks someone over. If there are injuries and you don’t have the proper insurance to cover the costs, you’re in trouble.

Own a pit bull? Like it or not some insurance companies won’t cover homeowners or renters that own that breed or any other deemed dangerous.

An insurance company may not care what kind of dog you have. Until it bites. At that point the company may charge a higher premium, choose not to renew coverage, or take the dog off of coverage.

Again, big bucks are at stake. The average cost paid out for dog bite claims nationwide was $44,760 in 2019,  up from $39,017 in 2018. And to reiterate, higher costs per claim include dogs knocking down children, cyclists, the elderly, etc.

While a special week is designated to dog bite awareness, you can understand why this is a constant concern.
—Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

Why Fireworks Scare Some Dogs but Not Others.

Can Dogs Who Are Afraid of Fireworks or Loud Noise Be Cured?

Panel urges more expansive guidelines for VA medical experiments on dogs.

Keeping canines cool. Good reminders.

Hero Park Ranger Carries Dehydrated Dog To Safety Down a Treacherous Mountain Trail.

Three-legged dog walks on hind legs with ease: ‘He wanted to move so bad he just stood up.’

Well, the #1 is no surprise!

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

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Heartwarming moment security guard protects dog goes viral.

10 Funny Photos Of Dogs From Prizewinning ‘Be More Dog’ Project.

We close as we always do with our closing video.

First…we head to Oklahoma.

And we know fireworks can be quite unnerving for dogs. Some studies show Independence Day has the highest number of runaway dogs.

Recommended by the American Kennel Club,  classical music called ‘Through A Dog’s Ear’ has a calming effect on dogs.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (06/27/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   A few clouds from time to time. High of 86. “A”

SUNDAY
:
Partly cloudy. High of 82. “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Reason #32520 this year is really screwed up.

Yeh, that was yesterday but we blog about it anyway.

Because this holiday if you will was more or less a bust this year. There were very few news or Internet stories this past week generating excitement for the big day that basically fizzled, thanks to COVID-19.

That’s unfortunate. As I’ve blogged in the past there are all kinds of benefits. Dogs in the office help reduce employee stress, boost office morale, promote productivity, improve communication, improve employee retention, and help workplaces appear more attractive to prospective employees.

However, let’s be honest. A virtual TYDTWD, though potentially interesting, just isn’t the same. Consider these recommended ideas for TYDTWD from pre-pandemic years:

An office picnic

A hot dog luncheon

Setting out some water bowls and treats

A photo booth for employees and dogs

A photo contest

Dog/owner look-a-like contests

A doggie parade

Best trick

Friendliest canine co-worker

Compare to the suggestions for 2020 from Pet Sitters International (PSI) , the folks who created TYDTWD:

Invite employees’ dogs to a virtual staff meeting. “While co-workers can’t meet one another’s dogs face-to-face at the office, seeing their canine co-workers on the screen during a virtual meeting will be a morale booster,” PSI officials said.

Share photos of employees’ dogs on the company’s blog or social media sites. “Encourage employees to submit photos of their dogs in their home office and post on the company blog or social media pages to celebrate the important role dogs (or other pets) play in the lives of employees,” officials added.

Invite a local animal shelter or pet rescue to virtually introduce adoptable pets to staff. “The goal of Take Your Dog to Work Day is to promote pet adoptions,” officials said. “Whether inviting a local pet-rescue organization to attend a staff Zoom meeting to introduce pets available for adoption or sending photos of adoptable pets through a company email, participating businesses can help pets find their forever homes.”

Host a virtual lunch and learn with a pet care expert. “Invite a veterinarian, professional pet sitter or other pet care professional to speak on an important pet care topic, such as pet first aid or helping pets deal with separation anxiety post-pandemic,” officials said. “Businesses could host this talk through Zoom, Microsoft Teams or another virtual meeting platform for staff.”

Good intentions. I repeat. Not the same.

Here’s an idea offered by a company that had to scale back this year. Re-schedule the event, depending on the virus situation, to August 26th. That would be National Dog Day.
—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

Law professor: Service dog industry in U.S. is largely unregulated, making people vulnerable to scams.

In fight to ban dog meat, China’s activists find an ally in the coronavirus.

Canine Owners Vow to Hound NYC Mayor Until Dog Parks and Runs Reopen.

How Training These Service Dogs Helps Veterans Heal.

The latest on dogs being trained to detect coronavirus.

Deaf dog’s pack provides ‘protection ears’ on outdoor adventures.

Not everyone loves your dog as much as you do, according to this columnist.

What makes a good dog walk?

Navy working dog donates blood to save Air Force canine colleague.

Custer’s canines: Army officer loved dogs and had dozens of canines.

Must love dogs! ‘Dog dads’ seen as more masculine, responsible and rich

Augie makes history.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK. AND WE’VE GOT A BUNCH.

On Tuesday, three Clearwater, FL officers came to the rescue of an adorable dog that had been locked inside a car in a beach parking garage. Thankfully, workers at the Holiday Inn & Suites called police about 2:15 p.m.after hearing a dog barking and howling inside a car that was parked there. Officers found the car was locked with the windows all the way up. They had to break one of the windows to pull the dog out of the hot car. They gave it water to drink and dabbed water on its head to try to cool it off. When Pinellas County Animal Control arrived about 10 to 15 minutes later, the temperature inside the car was still 94.6 degrees after having been open for some time. It’s safe to say the temperature inside the vehicle while the dog was still in it was well over 100 degrees. The case has been referred to the Pinellas-Pasco State Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

Dog owner recreates classic artworks by dressing up her pet pooch.

Grieving  family see pet dog’s face in cloud formation.

Oh Mama! Shelter Rescues Three Pregnant Dogs and Gives Each One Their Own Maternity Shoot.

Are you ready? Ready for Gunner the dog and his friend Delta? I bet not.

Dog is inseparable from stuffed toy.

We close as we always do with our closing video.

OK. We had photos of a dog and a dolphin. Here’s video from last Saturday of a dolphin saying ‘good morning’ to dogs at Isle of Hope Marina in Georgia. Magen Peigelbeck says the dolphin swam with their boat the whole morning, interacting with her two pups, Stanley and Miles. “It makes me grin and my heart get big,” Peigelbeck said. “Everyone can get along. We can learn lessons from animals.”

ALSO: Dog chaperones 5-year-old girl to and from the school bus stop every day.

AND: Dog Steals His Brother’s Food. The Way He Says Sorry Will Melt Your Heart.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (06/20/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Cloudy this morning. Thunderstorms – a few could contain very heavy rain, especially this afternoon. Storms may contain strong gusty winds. Chance of rain 90%. 1 to 2 inches of rain expected.  High of 83.  “D”

SUNDAY
:
Partly cloudy skies. High of 85.  “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Hate having to blog this every year.

But it’s happening already.

This week a Pennsylvania couple was arrested for leaving a dog in a hot car at a Home Depot parking lot in the town of Allegany. According to authorities 74-year-old Lynn Goodwill and 81-year-old Darell Goodwill of Smethport, Pa. left their Cocker Spaniel in their pickup truck without it running, and no windows open. The temperature outside was above 90 degrees.

Sheriff’s deputies and the local police were able to rescue the dog after 15 minutes.  A bystander was able to provide the dog with water and shade.

Both owners were charged with animal neglect, and were arrested and will have to appear in court. They’re 74 and 81 years old and should know better?

And a Michigan woman was cited for cruelty to animals after two dogs were spotted locked in a hot car. A Mt. Pleasant Public Safety Officer arrived on the scene at a Meijer parking lot and found a vehicle parked in an unshaded area, on an 80-degree day. The officer said there were two small dogs inside, and both were heavily panting and barking aggressively as the officer got closer. Another officer arrived and was able to check the interior temperature of the vehicle, getting results of 107 and 108 degrees, according to the police report.

One of the officers then went into the store and had the owner of the vehicle paged several times. The vehicle owner was found, and when brought to the car, officers said she indicated she did not believe it was hot inside the vehicle. She also told officers she had not been inside more than 30 minutes, where officers believed it to be over that time frame based on the time of the call and information from a witness.

Officers said the owner of the vehicle started the AC, insisting it was not that hot in the vehicle, despite officers showing her a thermometer showing read-outs of 107 and 108 degrees. The vehicle owner was cited for cruelty to animals.

Now, this video from June of 2016.

BRAVO!

Love that guy.

But suppose that scenario occurred here in Wisconsin. Could someone to the rescue be assured he/she would not be in any legal danger?

The answer is, go ahead. Toss that rock, after you follow some rules. Then smash away!

Wisconsin’s Hot Car Law was signed in 2015 by Governor Scott Walker.

WUWM reported on the details.

This law makes common sense. Let’s hope we never have to use it. Unfortunately there is no law against the lack of common sense.
—-Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

We informed you last week this could happen. And it did in Sioux City, Iowa.

Dogs Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19 Score Near-Perfect in Diagnosis of Human Sweat Samples.

Dogs can get heatstroke, too. Here are the breeds most at risk.

These groups are heroes.

THAT’S IT (yes, I know, a rare short list) FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

Happy 1st birthday to this cutie, Charlie! The inside is Classy Girl Cupcakes’ dog friendly Pup-Cake batter.

Owners share hilarious pictures of their pets with loaves in best new internet craze since sliced bread.

We close as we always do with our closing video.

Pet food manufacturer Stella & Chewy’s now owns its Oak Creek headquarters and production facility after a $24.5 million purchase closed this month.

The company has been in the 164,000-square-foot building since 2015 as a tenant, paying rent to real estate firms. That changes as Stella & Chewy’s bought the property from an affiliate of New York investor Lexington Realty Trust this month, according to state records.

Founded in 2003, the company’s pet food can be found in national retail chains such as Bentley’s Pet Stuff and Pet Supplies Plus. The company and state officials in 2018 announced a $30 million investment to add more equipment to the Oak Creek building.

Stella & Chewy’s qualified for a $500,000 state tax credit for that investment, and reported creating more than 142 jobs in the past two years, according to the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. website. Those hires are in addition to nearly 200 people already employed at Stella & Chewy’s.

Last October CBS 58 in Milwaukee did this feature report on the company.

Next, a photo of a boy and his dog has captured the hearts across New Hampshire.

We’ve got more.

Pre-K Students in Brooklyn Get Diploma Delivery from Tank, the Comfort Dog. Video is in the article.

And a TSA dog hangs up his boots after 8 years. His last bag search was all kinds of awesome.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (06/13/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Sunny. High of 63. “A”

SUNDAY
:  Sunny. High of 68. “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Did you see this cute story and video in this article in last week’s dog blog?

That postal worker is one of the lucky ones.

Last year, 5,803 letter carriers suffered a dog bite or attack. Many of those attacks came from dogs whose owners, not surprisingly, regularly used the phrase, “My dog won’t bite.” Any dog can bite.

Tameka Toliver, a letter carrier in Dearborn, Michigan says she was pinned on a porch by a dog that bit her above her knee.

“It happened so fast, even with all my training, I barely had time to react,” said Toliver.
“I’m still scared when I get close to that house because I remember the attack so vividly. It takes a long time to get over the fear.”

National Dog Bite Awareness Week, sponsored by the United States Postal Service, takes place June 14–20. This annual public service campaign provides safety tips and aims to increase owner responsibility in the prevention of dog attacks.

Mail carriers are given explicit instructions on how to avoid becoming a statistic. They’re encouraged to carry dog repellent, one full can within reach at all times. Any dog incidents on their route are to be reported to a supervisor. If approached by a dog, carriers should resist the impulse to scream and run away. Running will more than likely trigger the dog to chase. Carriers are told to remain still, place your satchel between you and the dog, and avoid eye contact. Then when the dog calms down, back away slowly to ensure you don’t stumble and fall.

What can you do to keep your carrier safe?

When a carrier comes to the home, keep dogs inside the house or behind a fence, away from the door,  in another room, or on a leash.

Keep in mind that if the carrier deems a residence unsafe because of an unrestrained dog, mail delivery service can be interrupted, not just for that address, but for the neighborhood. Mail would then have to be picked up at the Post Office.

Across the country mail carriers have begun placing a do paw sticker on the outside of a mailbox where there is a known dog in the immediate area.  A yellow sticker indicates a dog resides at the next delivery address. An orange sticker means a dog resides at that address.

No photo description available.

Want the sticker removed? The Post Office will do it, just ask.

Where did most of the bites of carriers take place last year?

City State 2019
HOUSTON TX 85
LOS ANGELES CA 74
CHICAGO IL 54
CLEVELAND OH 51
DALLAS TX 40
COLUMBUS OH 35
PHILADELPHIA PA 34
TOLEDO OH 32
DENVER CO 30
SAN DIEGO CA 29
BALTIMORE MD 29
LOUISVILLE KY 28
SAN ANTONIO TX 28
FORT WORTH TX 27
DETROIT MI 26
CINCINNATI OH 26
SACRAMENTO CA 25
KANSAS CITY MO 25
EL PASO TX 25
MEMPHIS TN 24
PHOENIX AZ 23
ST LOUIS MO 22
ALBUQUERQUE NM 22
LONG BEACH CA 21
JACKSONVILLE FL 21
INDIANAPOLIS IN 21
CHARLOTTE NC 21
SEATTLE WA 21
MINNEAPOLIS MN 20
DAYTON OH 20

—Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

Waukesha County judge backs county’s decision ordering a family to euthanize their dog or move.

Lots of us adopted dogs in quarantine: ‘Dog Whisperer’ César Millán has some tips.

Bond between humans and dogs strengthened by COVID-19.

This comfort dog made a virtual visit to children at this New Berlin school.

Oklahoma family camps out for 27 hours to adopt dog with ‘black heart.’

World’s tallest dog is now the oldest living Great Dane.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

The Siberian Husky breeder, Stephen Biddlecombe, sits among some of his dogs at his home, in Tonbridge, England, on June 4, 2020. Photo: Peter Nicholls / Reuters

We close as we always do with our closing video.

First, in Florida…

Now we head to New Hampshire.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

The Barking Lot – America’s Finest Dog Blog (06/06/20)

The Barking Lot is a regular weekly feature of This Just In…Written by my lovely wife, Jennifer and me.  It opens with the weekend dog walking forecast followed by the main blog from dog lover, Jennifer. Then it’s DOGS IN THE NEWS and our close. Enjoy!

THE WEEKEND DOG-WALKING FORECAST: We grade the weather outlook for taking your pet outdoors.

TODAY:   Sunny. High of 71. “A”

SUNDAY
:  Partly cloudy. High of 73. “A”

Now, here’s my lovely wife, Jennifer, with this week’s main blog.

Talk about your separation anxiety.

Dog Sleeps on Wedding Dress Train Photobomb (With images) | Dogs ...

This little lady didn't want to be left out of the ceremony

OK. Those are just scene-stealing moments and not signs of stress. But as we reported last week, with lockdowns ending (albeit gradually) and workers returning to their offices, dogs left behind are wondering, what just happened? What’s going on here? Their humans used to be around all day. Now they’re…gone.

That could mean a case of SRD. Separation-related distress. A crisis? Not exactly. But enough that public warnings are being disseminated by the media.

Dogs of all ages can get SRD. The more susceptible to SRD are dogs that are newly adopted, or senior dogs who are experiencing more general anxiety.

Chris Muldoon, Operations Manager at Dogs for Good in the United Kingdom describes SRD like this:

“Separation anxiety is triggered by the removal of something in the dog’s life that is a constant part of its life at the moment and generally that is people. So if you leave the home at 7:30 in the morning, you grab your keys and head out of the door these can be triggers for the dog to realize that the rest of the day is going to be spent without the person they would rather be with.”

The stress can lead to barking or crying that can’t be comforted, excessive drooling, pacing, chewing or scratching at doors, dilated pupils, panting, trembling, pacing, destruction, loss of bladder or bowel control, or hyper reactions to the owner leaving or returning.

Experts say there are ways to avoid SRD. Here are a few:

The best, easiest method: Occasionally leave the house, without the dog.

Change Your “Going Away” Signals. Use a different door, put your coat on but don’t leave for 15 minutes, leave your keys/purse/shoes in a different location. When you leave, give your dog a treat or a toy to play with to distract them.

Downplay Goodbyes and Hellos. Don’t get emotional when leaving your dog and overexcited when you come back.

Leave Comfort Items and Background Music on for Your Dog. Items that have your scent such as dirty laundry can help your dog relax and remember that you will come back. Soothing nature sounds or can help your dog relax and fall asleep.

Working from home?  Alternate between having the dog in the same room and being somewhere alone elsewhere in the house.

Go for walks.

Play fetch.

Play tug-of-war.

Use treat-dispensing toys.  

Make your dog “hunt” for his meals by hiding small piles of his kibble around your house or yard when you leave.

Put your dog in a room or crate (if he/she loves her crate), shut the door, and leave the room for short bits of time.  Slowly increase the time you are out of the room, starting with a few seconds and building up to 15-30 minutes.

If possible, take your dog to work with you.

Arrange for a family member, friend or dog sitter to come to your home and stay with your dog when you’re not there.

Do NOT scold or punish your dog.

If all fails contact a vet.
—Jennifer Fischer

Thanks Jennifer!

Time now for DOGS IN THE NEWS, canines that made headlines the past week.

In Milwaukee, Dog’s Death Blamed on Protesters.

USDA confirms that Winston the pug, believed to be first dog with coronavirus, was never infected.

Amy Cooper, infamous Central Park ‘Karen,’ gets dog returned to her by animal rescue group.

A blind therapy dog brings joy to assisted-living residents with visits through the window.

Historic plane to transport Thomas Waerner home to Norway after dog musher left stranded in Alaska.

War dog cemetery in Michigan draws national acclaim.

THAT’S IT FOR DOGS IN THE NEWS.

HERE’S OUR DOG PHOTO(s) OF THE WEEK.

In Perry Barr, England, greyhounds resume racing, behind closed doors, as restrictions on sporting events are relaxed. Photograph: Clive Mason/Getty Images

In Singapore, a Maltese poodle is groomed as pet services resume after the coronavirus outbreak. Photograph: Edgar Su/Reuters

We close as we always do with our closing video, and we have a few.

First, dog rescued from landslide. The video is in this article.

Next, from the BBC:

Because you’re dying to know: Do animals belong on TikTok?

AND, Winnie loves her mailman. The video is in this article.

That’s it for this week.

Thanks for stopping by.

We kindly ask that you please share with other dog lovers you know.

See ya, BARK, next Saturday morning!

That’s Izzie. We prayed for Izzie this week. Found!