Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #46: WI will not be commandeered on gun rights

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

The White House, Democrats in Congress, and the Tony Evers administration all have an anti-gun agenda. Our Second Amendment rights are under attack from all.

Rebecca believes Wisconsin state and local law enforcement should never be commandeered by federal law to enforce restrictions on our rights.

FYI…

Associated Press(Tim) Michels’ campaign sent out a flyer that landed in mailboxes that claimed the gun advocacy group had endorsed him. Scott Meyer, a Wisconsin lobbyist who has done work for the NRA, said the group hasn’t endorsed anyone in the GOP primary and doesn’t plan to do so.

“All this came out of the blue,” Meyer said of the flyer. “Stunned is the best word to describe it. I’ve never seen this before.”

Wisconsin Right Now:
 Was (Tim) Michels endorsed by the NRA, as he claims in the direct mail piece? The answer is no, according to the NRA.

We contacted the national NRA press office on July 17 and were given this response, from Scott Jones, NRA Wisconsin state director: “The NRA Political Victory Fund (NRA-PVF) has not made any endorsements for the 2022 Wisconsin gubernatorial primary.”

Michels’ flyer says he was endorsed by the “NRA-ILA,” however the NRA told us that the NRA-ILA doesn’t make endorsements ever; the NRA-PVF does, and it has not made an endorsement in the Wisconsin governor’s primary, as noted.

As a sportsman herself, Rebecca is a proven, trusted advocate for gun owners and 2nd Amendment rights. She is proud to have an A rating from the NRA.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #45: Dumping the personal property tax

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

As part of major tax reform Rebecca wants to end the personal  property tax and move toward lower, flatter income tax rates.

Why should it be that Illinois has a single flat tax rate at 4.95%, whereas Wisconsinites get penalized for making more money, and most families pay at the 5.3% rate?

During a campaign stop in Oconto this week Rebecca said ending the personal property tax would save small businesses $200 million annually, money they can use to increase worker pay.

Tax rate reduction, she said, was necessary because of what she termed “hyper-inflation” – referring to the U.S. rate of 9.1% in June, a 41-year high – though that term is used by economists to describe price hikes of several hundred percent per year.

She said the tax cuts are needed to encourage workers to enter and stay in the workforce. “If more people do not make more money or keep more of their own money, it seems not worth it (to work),” she said.

Of special note, Rebecca has advocated for getting rid of the personal prorty tax for a long time, and not just a few weeks ago.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #44: School dollars need to follow the child

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

Rebecca believes that our educational system works best when funding follows students and their parents as opposed to educational systems, i.e. buildings and bureaucrats.

“All kids deserve an equal shot at the American dream, starting with a solid basic education, but that’s not what our current system is delivering for many,” says Rebecca. “Especially with an influx of new state and federal education dollars, we must remain vigilant to ensure dollars go into the classroom. It is an absolute shame when teachers spend their personal dollars on school supplies for their neediest students, while at the same time millions of new dollars wash into district bank accounts. Actual instruction must be the priority for school spending.”

Amen.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #43: Tax pledge

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

Back in 1980 when I worked at WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio I extensively covered the election between Milwaukee’s most famous mayor, Henry Maier, and his opponent, Dennis Conta.

During his toughest re-election campaign in 1980 Maier narrowly lost the primary to Conta who argued for a tax on suburbanites who worked in the city of Milwaukee.

Maier would have none of it and countered at the time that you do not reduce taxes by increasing other taxes. Maier went on to defeat Conta.

I thought about that local election more than 40 years ago as I listened this morning to the GOP gubernatorial debate on Newstalk 1130 WISN’s Dan O’Donnell Show.

Rebecca reiterated her plan to reduce the state’s personal income tax, offering specific reasons why the move would be of great benefit. The moderator O’Donnell said the Legislature might be open to the idea but also is talkabout a sales tax increase. Would Rebecca support such a “tax swap” O’Donnell asked. I don’t know if O’Donnell intended it to a be a “gotcha” moment but it wasn’t.

A la Henry Maier Rebecca repeated she will not favor and would veto any net tax increases. She mentioned the pledge during today’s debate, and it was the subject of an op-ed piece a few days ago on Forbes.com by Patrick Gleason, vice president of state affairs at Americans for Tax Reform. Gleason wrote:

In addition to being the most specific on the direction in which she would like to take the state’s tax code, Kleefisch is also the only candidate who has made it clear to Wisconsin voters, in writing, that she would veto any net tax hike that might be sent to her desk. While Rebecca Kleefisch has signed the Taxpayer Protection Pledge, a written commitment to Wisconsin residents to veto net tax hikes, Tim Michels and Timothy Ramthun have thus far declined to make that same commitment to Wisconsin residents.

In addition to calling for income tax relief, Kleefisch also proposed cutting the state’s personal property tax and called for a relocation of state agencies out of Madison to other, lower cost communities. Many Republican primary voters will likely find Kleefisch to be in good company in signing the Taxpayer Protection Pledge, which has been signed by Governors Ron DeSantis, Kim Reynolds, Doug Ducey, Greg Abbott, Bill Lee, and Chris Sununu, among others. In fact, thanks to Governor Glenn Youngkin’s victory in Virginia last November, there are now 16 incumbent governors who are signers of the Taxpayer Protection Pledge — the most in history.

Whereas Kleefisch provided the most details about her policy priorities during (Sunday’s) debate, Michels was less specific. When the debate moderator pressed Michels to name a reform he’d pursue upon taking office, Michels alluded to an earlier reference about his interest in auditing state agencies in a manner similar to that with which he monitors the performance of his business.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #42: Rural broadband

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

During Sunday’s GOP debate in Milwaukee Rebecca mentioned rural broadband.

She recognizes the governor’s job is to make sure economic prosperity extends to every corner of Wisconsin. We must invest in rural areas, not just cities, including broadband so more can be done on-line, improving rural life and tourism.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #41: No sanctuary cities

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

The website The Economist describes sanctuary cities:

American cities, counties or states that protect undocumented immigrants from deportation by limiting cooperation with federal immigration authorities. Some decline to use city or state tax dollars to enforce federal immigration laws. Many prohibit local officials from asking people about their immigration status. Sanctuary policies can be mandated expressly by law or practiced unofficially.

Years ago the USA TODAY editorial board wrote that the more than 300 sanctuary cities across the country violate common sense:

Protecting a hard-working undocumented immigrant charged with a misdemeanor is one thing. Putting a long-term felon and serial illegal entrant on the street is the antithesis of ensuring public safety.That’s especially true when there is a more reasonable approach, one used, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, by many police departments under sanctuary laws. Officers pick up the phone to call immigration when they plan to release potentially dangerous immigrants wanted for deportation. Immigration comes to pick them up.

Rebecca favors a ban on sanctuary cities and says, “Wisconsin believes in the rule of law, and local police should not facilitate a catch-and-release policy for people breaking any law.”

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #40: Protect liberties during a pandemic

POSTING A REASON DAILY UNTIL THE PRIMARY

2021…

During the pandemic many referred to nurses as “healthcare heroes.” Then those heroes were forced to choose between their profession and a personal healthcare decision.

The Wisconsin Constitution promises, “The right of every person to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of conscience shall never be infringed.” The state is to make certain of no “control of, or interference with, the rights of conscience.”

Rebecca says “state law should ensure robust protection for the rights of conscience and religious objectors. We should never allow government to infringe on the rights of an individual’s medical freedom.”

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #39: Cutting the cost of state government

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Rebecca believes we must keep working to reduce the burden of state government on Wisconsin families.

She wants the WI Legislature to create an “anti-appropriations committee” that would find ways to save tax dollars and cut expenditures. And why not? We already have legislative committees that consistently are lobbied to spend, spend, spend

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #38: Teaching life skills

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Rebecca believes the biggest goal of education is not just prepping for college or a career, but for life.

There are the hard skills of reading and writing, but also soft skills such as job interviews, public speaking. and financial literacy.

“Employers tell me all the time that they can teach how to run a machine, but it’s much harder if the employee doesn’t show up on time day after day. We need statewide standards for soft skills that focus on the same college and career readiness we see for hard skills,” says Rebecca.

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Reasons I’m voting for Rebecca Kleefisch on August 9, #37: Small Biz

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Rebecca believes a plan to create jobs must put people first.

What does that mean?  Consider tax credits. They need to be leveraged so that Wisconsin employers are able to hire and train previously unemployed workers.

“When I left the news business, it was to start a small, one-woman marketing company,” said Rebecca. “We need to support the side hustles, the Etsy earners, the downtown shops and Main Street moms looking to make it. While huge business deals that create thousands of jobs are exciting to land, small businesses make up 97.7% of all the employers in Wisconsin and should be our focus.”

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