Today’s highly interesting read (07/09/20): America Needs To Stop Reacting To Coronavirus Like A Bunch Of Hysterics

Seriously, no disrespect to our military, but if WWIII erupted tomorrow, there’s no guarantee we’d be victorious

Today’s read is from Mollie Ziegler Hemingway, a senior editor at The Federalist and Senior Journalism Fellow at Hillsdale College. Here’s an excerpt, followed by a link to her very insightful column.

Americans put a man on the freaking moon, landed a robot on a postage size stamp of land on Mars, harnessed the power of the atom, defeated Germany in a world war — twice, invented the automobile, and defeated gravity and invented human flight. Yet right now many of us are sitting alone in our homes behind cloth masks with dubious protective qualities thinking about banning children from attending school even though they are at extremely low risk of infection or as vectors of transmission.

Read it all right here.

 

 

Today’s highly interesting read (07/08/20): Trump Should Yank Federal Funds From Every School That Refuses To Open This Fall

The president tweeting today. Before that tweet, Joy Pullmann, the executive editor of The Federalist was writing about the issue. Here’s an excerpt followed by a link to the entire column.

This situation is madness, and we all know it. American kids and families deserve far, far better than we are getting from public officials. Being constantly at some politically driven unelected bureaucrat’s mercy is psychologically and educationally devastating, besides unconstitutional.

Taxpayers should not pay premium dollars for freemium results. Paying an average of $15,000 per year for every public schooled student is an absolutely ridiculous price for getting random worksheets, YouTube videos, chaos and confusion, and little personal attention.

Read it all here.

 

 

 

 

UPDATE: Today’s highly interesting read (03/30/20): Trump Is Right: We Need to Get Our $20 Trillion Economy Back Up and Running

Previously on This Just In…

The blog quoted the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board:

“No society can safeguard public health for long at the cost of its overall economic health.”

And Ed Feulner, the former president and founder of the Heritage Foundation and Stephen Moore, a senior fellow at Heritage:

“We have a $20 trillion highly tuned economic engine — the envy of the world. That engine can’t be shut down for months and then with the switch of an ignition switch powered back up.”

The update: While managing the virus, America must open its economy and get people back to work.

Today’s highly interesting read (07/06/20): Hearing What Black Voices Really Say About Police

There’s this…

But there’s also this…

Today’s read is from Michael Javen Fortner, the author of Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment, who teaches political science at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Here’s an excerpt, followed by a link to the entire column:

While it is true that black men between the ages of 25 and 29 are killed by police at a rate between 2.8 and 4.1 per 100,000, that’s well below the rate of their death in accidents (76.6 deaths per 100,000), by suicide (26.7 deaths per 100,000), from other homicides (22 per 100,000), from heart disease (seven per 100,000), and from cancer (a little over six per 100,000).

Moreover, black women in the same age bracket are killed by police at roughly 5 percent the rate of black men; surely if police killings were driven solely by racial animus, then black women would be victimized at a much higher rate.

Read the whole column here.

Today’s highly interesting read (07/05/20): For God’s sake, stop demonizing the NYPD: Cardinal Dolan

Today’s read is from Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the archbishop of New York, formerly the archbishop of Milwaukee. Here’s an excerpt, followed by a link to Dolan’s complete column.

Our valiant police officers have one of the most perilous, stressful duties around, and from what I have seen in my nearly dozen years here, they do it with care, compassion and competence.

Now we have added to their load with continual, at times exaggerated, rash and inaccurate criticism, combined with rocks, Molotov cocktails, and taunts. But we know that while bad apples there indeed may be, they are very rare. As I mentioned to Police Commissioner Dermot Shea during a recent meeting, this point particularly resonates with me, as I have seen the overwhelming majority of good, faithful priests tarred by the heinous actions of a very few.

Read Dolan’s complete piece here.

 

 

 

Derek Chauvin; lockdowns; Biden and dementia; police leaving; and police in schools

Here are this week’s highly interesting reads:

Today’s highly interesting read (07/03/20): The Coronavirus Lockdowns are Over…And These Studies Really Deliver a Death Blow

2ND UPDATE: Today’s highly interesting read (06/10/20): America, We Are Leaving

Today’s highly interesting read (07/02/20): The Strategies of Dementia Politics

Today’s highly interesting read (06/30/20): Don’t replace School Resource Officers, give them more help

Today’s highly interesting read (06/29/20): Why Derek Chauvin May Get Off His Murder Charge

Today’s highly interesting read (07/03/20): The Coronavirus Lockdowns are Over…And These Studies Really Deliver a Death Blow

Today’s read is from columnist Matt Vespa. Here’s an excerpt.

And as more data trickles in, the more studies are showing that lockdowns actually hurt this nation more than it benefited from them. In fact, like the CDC study on this virus’s mortality rate, it totally undercuts why we even had to stay home in the first place. Rather than validating draconian lockdown orders, the latest economic research on Covid-19 suggests that social-distancing efforts in general, and shelter-in-place measures in particular, have done more harm than good.

Read about the economic impact of social distancing here.

Today’s highly interesting read (07/02/20): The Strategies of Dementia Politics

Today’s read is from one of the great columnists of our time, Victor Davis Hanson,  the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author, most recently, of The Case for Trump. Here’s an excerpt, followed by the entire column:

In the chaos of July, Biden’s handlers have been acclaimed geniuses for anesthetizing him. But in the different season of October, he may finally be forced out from his lockdown, in the wild manner that soon-to-be looters and arsonists at last emerged from quarantine in June — pent-up, angry, incoherent, and self-destructive.

You can read it all here.

Today’s highly interesting read (06/30/20): Don’t replace School Resource Officers, give them more help

Earlier this month the Milwaukee School Board voted unanimously to approve the following:

Be it RESOLVED, That the Milwaukee Board of School Directors terminates immediately all contracts with the Milwaukee Police Department for the services of School Resource Officers and other personnel; and be it FURTHER RESOLVED,

That the Milwaukee Board of School Directors directs the Superintendent to cease any further negotiations with the Milwaukee Police Department for the services of School Resource Officers and other personnel.

Today’s read is from Joey Melvin, an instructor and Region 3 director for the National Association of School Resource Officers and a detective/school resource officer with the Georgetown Police Department in Sussex County. He has spent more 18 years in law enforcement and was formerly deputy director of Delaware’s Comprehensive School Safety Plan. Here’s an excerpt, followed by a link to the entire column:

Some communities across the country want to divert SRO resources to nurses and full-time mental health support. The value of adding health resources to our schools cannot be disputed. However, as an experienced school resource professional, I feel that what needs to transpire is not a transference of focus or funding, but an addition to resources within our schools. In my opinion, replacing one resource with another cannot occur without negative impacts.

As SROs know their communities, they also know their students. Understanding a student’s background and, more importantly, any trauma our students have experienced plays an integral role in an SRO’s decisions. While I have countless stories to support this, I feel compelled to share this one.

Read it all here.

 

Today’s highly interesting read (06/29/20): Why Derek Chauvin May Get Off His Murder Charge

Derek Chauvin is the former officer who was charged with charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter following a bystander video showing Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck.

Alexander Kueng, Tou Thao and Thomas Lane – the other officers on the scene – are each charged with aiding and abetting murder and manslaughter. Kueng and Lane helped restrain Floyd while he was on the ground while Thao looked on and failed to intervene, according to a criminal complaint filed June 3.

Today (June 29) Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill agreed that public commentary on the case has reached inappropriate levels, specifically noting that people aligned with the prosecution are pushing it toward a change of venue.

“It’s in everyone’s best interest” that no public statements about the case be made, Cahill said, noting that they’ve come from family, friends and law enforcement officials. “What they’re doing is endangering the right to a fair trial. They need to understand that.”

A look at the video shows actions by the police that are undoubtedly reprehensible, disgusting.

But is this a slam dunk case? Proving intent to murder is difficult in the court of law.

Today’s read is not meant to persuade or take a side. It is, as the title suggests, highly interesting.

One  news outlet details the inherent problems with the Minneapolis case. In an article titled “Why Derek Chauvin May Get Off His Murder Charge,” Medium reports:

The video is unquestionably horrific.

But in our rush to condemn an aggressive use of force and pursue justice for George Floyd, we have ignored crucial information which is necessary in judging the conduct of the officers. While nothing can absolve George Floyd’s death, these facts do cast doubt on the appropriateness of a murder charge for Chauvin, and paint a more nuanced picture of the events leading up to the tragic encounter.

There are six crucial pieces of information — six facts — that have been largely omitted from discussion on the Chauvin’s conduct.

Read the entire column here.