Today’s highly interesting read (01/21/19): Shocking Stories Will Make You Want To Build The Wall Yourself

Scott Morefield is a freelance reporter for The Daily Caller.

Matt C. Pinsker, author, national security expert, criminal defense attorney, US Army Reserve officer, and homeland security professor at Virginia Commonwealth University – is in a unique position to provide valuable insight on how desperately the United States needs a physical barrier on its southern border, and was happy to answer a few questions for our readers.

As far as you are allowed, can you detail some specific cases that the public would be particularly struck by?

Read the entire Q and A here.

The shutdown, lack of local news, superintendent salaries, and MLK

Here are this week’s highly interesting reads:

Today’s highly interesting read (01/17/19): It’s Up to Us to Realize Dr. King’s Dream

Today’s highly interesting read (01/16/19): School superintendent salaries in the Milwaukee suburbs

Today’s highly interesting read (01/15/19): It’s lacking in Franklin, and all over the state

Today’s highly interesting read (01/14/19): It’s A Shutdown, Not Armageddon

Today’s highly interesting read (01/17/19): It’s Up to Us to Realize Dr. King’s Dream

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From columnist Tom Purcell:

Too many of us are consumed with hatred and anger, which have reared their ugly heads in our public discourse lately. Dr. King, who endured hatred so ugly and excessive that it led to his assassination, spoke often of the futility of hating anyone or anything – of how hating harms the hater than the hated.

Read more about the words of MLK here.

Today’s highly interesting read (01/16/19): School superintendent salaries in the Milwaukee suburbs

The superintendent of a local school district has an important and challenging job.

But should his/her salary be greater than the governor of the state of Wisconsin ($144,423 according to an Internet search)?

The Journal Sentinel compared the salaries of superintendents in Milwaukee suburbs.

When it comes to superintendent salaries for school districts in the Milwaukee suburbs, the district administrators at Nicolet and Arrowhead are at the head of the class.

Surprisingly, those districts are among the smallest in terms of enrollment for the metropolitan area.

This portion is especially interesting:

Are the salaries justified?

 

Today’s highly interesting read (01/15/19): It’s lacking in Franklin, and all over the state

Last July I blogged:

No local papers around here are shutting down to my knowledge. But we’ve seen the detrimental effects of cuts.

A few years ago the NOW sites including Franklin’s dropped all their bloggers, dozens of them. These bloggers wrote exclusively about their communities, often covering local government meetings. That coverage was never replaced.

Today the local news coverage of Franklin in the restructured mysouthnow website is pretty skimpy. They’re not exactly breaking any news bulletins and tend to shy away from controversy.

That happens when a news service and media voices are cut or eliminated. Whole neighborhoods suffer.

That same month I quoted from an on-line article:

New research shows that the decline of newspapers may have taken a toll on cities’ and counties’ budgets…municipal borrowing costs increased by as much as a tenth of a percent after a newspaper shuttered, even when accounting for declining economic conditions.

The reason for these changes, researchers say, is that the closure of a local newspaper creates a “local information vacuum” that is unlikely to be filled by the national news media, which needs to appeal to a much broader audience, or online outlets, which have not generally filled the investigative journalism gap left when a local newspaper shuts down.

From today’s read:

These stories prompted Media Trackers to examine how local media covers local government. We reached out to  newspaper editors asking how often they covered local governmental meetings in several Wisconsin communities. We received no response. We then asked local governments about how often the media attends their meetings.

In general, our findings indicate that coverage of local government by media varies…school boards tend to see the least coverage.

Good stuff. I urge you to read it all here.

 

Today’s highly interesting read (01/14/19): It’s A Shutdown, Not Armageddon

Google “government shutdown” and you’ll easily find all kinds of stories about repercussions:

Marc Thiessen: This is the stupidest government shutdown in US …

Government shutdown stymies immigrants’ asylum cases

How the government shutdown is disrupting science

Houston, Miami airports close some security checkpoints

Why the Government Shutdown Is Increasing Fire Risks in California

Federal worker forced to ration insulin because of government shutdown

The editorial board at Investor’s Business Daily offers a rarely heard perspective:

The point is, these shutdowns while inconvenient and politically disruptive have never been a major economic event…it’s not likely to take down the economy.

Read the entire editorial.

 

Clearing sidewalk snow; homeless women, poor parent sportsmanship, social media’s hurt on America

Here are this week’s highly interesting reads:

Today’s highly interesting read (01/11/19): Why Cities, Not Individuals, Should Clear Snow From Sidewalks

Today’s highly interesting read (01/10/19): Unsafe spaces

Today’s highly interesting read (01/09/19): Dear Mom and Dad: Cool it

Today’s highly interesting read (01/08/19): Alexa causing chaos at my parents’ house

Today’s highly interesting read (01/07/19): Social media is hurting America, and 2019 is the year we need to do something about it

Today’s highly interesting read (01/11/19): Why Cities, Not Individuals, Should Clear Snow From Sidewalks

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Waukesha, WI

When I post these articles there are times I’m not necessarily in total agreement.

Most cities across the United States leave the responsibility of sidewalk snow removal to homeowners, landlords, and businesses. The results are haphazard at best, and don’t account for vacant properties and residents who don’t have the physical ability to shovel or the means to pay someone to do it for them. In cold-weather cities, the most vulnerable residents can be at risk for months at a time.

OK. But I can just imagine property tax bills soaring even higher.

Read the entire column here.

Today’s highly interesting read (01/10/19): Unsafe spaces

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Thousands of women in America are homeless primarily because they’re victims of violence. Sophia Lee of WORLD Magazine examined this aspect of the homelessness crisis:

Mel Tillekeratne of Monday Night Mission, a nonprofit that feeds the homeless…founded the organization in 2011 after making a wrong turn into the heart of Skid Row, a 54-block area with the most concentrated homelessness in the nation.

One night at the Monday Night Mission, a petite 56-year-old whom Tillekeratne had befriended approached him with tear-glistening eyes. “Don’t say nothing,” she warned him. Tillekeratne was alarmed: “Tell me. Tell me what happened.” After some coaxing, the woman finally told him she had just been raped. Tillekeratne jumped up: “There’s a police station a block away. Let’s go. They’ll take care of you.” The woman let out a laugh: “What do you think will happen when I go to the police? I sleep in a tent. If I snitch, they’ll kill me or rape me worse than before.”

Read the entire article here.