Today’s highly interesting read (03/19/18): In colleges it’s not just the admissions that are scandalous

Today’s read is from Walter E. Williams, a professor of economics at George Mason University.

Federal prosecutors have charged more than 50 people involved in cheating and bribery in order to get their children admitted to some of the nation’s most prestigious colleges and universities such as Georgetown, Yale, Stanford, University of Texas, University of Southern California and UCLA. They often paid more than $100,000 to rig SAT or ACT exams. In some instances, they bribed college officials and secured their children’s admissions to elite schools through various fraud schemes. As corrupt and depraved as these recent revelations are, they are only the tip of the iceberg of generalized college corruption and gross dishonesty.

Read the entire column here.

Praise for Obama; harassing Trump fans; DST; smartphones; Irish humor

Here are this week’s highly interesting reads:

Today’s highly interesting read (03/15/19): Irish humor

Today’s highly interesting read (03/13/19): Sheriff David Clarke and I applaud…Obama?

20TH UPDATE: Today’s highly interesting read (08/08/17): Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Today’s highly interesting read (03/12/19): You don’t have a right to harass Trump supporters

UPDATE: Today’s highly interesting read (03/16/18): In praise of the hated daylight saving time

Today’s highly interesting read (03/13/19): Sheriff David Clarke and I applaud…Obama?

During Barack Obama’s eight year in the White House I can document two occasions where I blogged in favor.

One of them was when I particularly liked this passage from his 2011 State of the Union Address:

We shouldn’t just give our people a government that’s more affordable.  We should give them a government that’s more competent and more efficient.  We can’t win the future with a government of the past.  (Applause.)

We live and do business in the Information Age, but the last major reorganization of the government happened in the age of black-and-white TV.  There are 12 different agencies that deal with exports.  There are at least five different agencies that deal with housing policy.  Then there’s my favorite example:  The Interior Department is in charge of salmon while they’re in fresh water, but the Commerce Department handles them when they’re in saltwater.  (Laughter.)  I hear it gets even more complicated once they’re smoked.  (Laughter and applause.)

Now, we’ve made great strides over the last two years in using technology and getting rid of waste.  Veterans can now download their electronic medical records with a click of the mouse.  We’re selling acres of federal office space that hasn’t been used in years, and we’ll cut through red tape to get rid of more.  But we need to think bigger.  In the coming months, my administration will develop a proposal to merge, consolidate, and reorganize the federal government in a way that best serves the goal of a more competitive America.  I will submit that proposal to Congress for a vote –- and we will push to get it passed.  (Applause.)

And on the old FranklinNow website I praised the White House initiative My Brother’s Keeper. Part of the initiative involved transforming barber shops into mini libraries.

The president frequently spoke about the importance of fatherhood.

Former Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke also spent most of his time in his latest column praising the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, but also ripped a feminist who attacked Obama’s program.

Read Clarke’s column here.

 

Today’s highly interesting read (03/12/19): You don’t have a right to harass Trump supporters

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Today’s read is from Gil Smart, a columnist at TCPalm.

We don’t assault one another in this country because of our political views.

You don’t like Trump? Good for you. There’s a lot not to like. But however malicious you may think the man and his presidency, however “unsafe” he makes you feel, it does not give you the right to make others unsafe.

I can’t believe I actually have to write this. But apparently, I do.

Read the entire column here.

 

 

Dangerous marijuana; AOC; The Golden Fleece; and moving the clocks

This week’s highly interesting reads:

Today’s highly interesting read (03/08/19): “Building a Legacy” Proxmire: Bulldog of the Senate

Today’s highly interesting read (03/07/19): Why ‘springing forward’ takes my dad weeks

Today’s highly interesting read (03/06/19): Is the drive to legalize marijuana ignoring major risks?

Today’s highly interesting read (03/05/19): Yes AOC, It’s Creepy When People Don’t Mind Their Own Business

 

Today’s highly interesting read (03/08/19): “Building a Legacy” Proxmire: Bulldog of the Senate

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Today’s read is from WisPolitics.com:

The following is an excerpt from Proxmire: Bulldog of the Senate, by Jonathan Kasparek, published by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press. The book is available through libraries and book retailers statewide and online at www.wisconsinhistory.org/store. The book is also available as an e-book.

Excerpted from Chapter 9: “Building a Legacy” Proxmire: Bulldog of the Senate

From 1950 to 1989, William Proxmire was a major figure in Wisconsin politics, serving one term in the legislature before running for governor. Denied the governorship three times in six years, he shocked everyone by winning a special election in 1957 to replace the late U.S. Senator Joe McCarthy, and he went on to win reelection six times. Known for championing consumer protection legislation and farming interests, Senator Proxmire also fought continuously against wasteful government spending, highlighting the most egregious examples with his monthly “Golden Fleece Awards.”

Proxmire began the Golden Fleece Awards—which would become his most popular and longest-lasting attack on federal spending—in 1975.

On March 11, Proxmire issued a press release awarding a Golden Fleece to the National Science Foundation for spending $84,000 on a University of Minnesota study on why people fall in love. It set the tone for ridicule that would characterize the award for the next thirteen years.

Read the rest here.

Today’s highly interesting read (03/07/19): Why ‘springing forward’ takes my dad weeks

Daylight Saving Time 2019: When Clocks Spring Forward

Today’s read is from Tom Purcell, a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review humor columnist. Here’s an excerpt.

Nobody dreads daylight saving time more than my father.

He has his work cut out for him this coming weekend, when we “spring forward” by setting clocks ahead by an hour before going to bed Saturday night.

You see, my mother loves clocks – so much that he has 14 clocks to reset.

There’s more. Read the entire column here.

Today’s highly interesting read (03/06/19): Is the drive to legalize marijuana ignoring major risks?

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Today’s read is from USA TODAY:

In less than 25 years, marijuana has gone from illegal everywhere in the United States to legal for at least some uses in all but four states.

But as cultural acceptance of cannabis grows, opponents are warning of potential downsides. 

These critics – doctors, police and auto safety officials, parents – point to stories and studies that link the drug to suicide, schizophrenia and car crashes.

Quite an article. Read it here.