Today’s highly interesting read (07/29/20): To Hell With Professional Sports

Pro sports are returning. Baseball is back.

The NBA season starts Thursday.

I for one am glad to see games again. But I realize not everyone agrees, like columnist Derek Hunter.

At the outset, I have to say that I’ve never been the biggest sports fan on the planet. So it isn’t a big sacrifice for me to say I’m not going to watch professional sports this year, or maybe ever again. I never actively shunned pro sports, and as a kid I wouldn’t have missed a Tigers or Lions game for just about anything in the world, I just found other things to do as I got older. But I’d wander back for interesting games or championships – there are few things a person isn’t directly involved with that are as exciting as a contest between great athletes when the stakes are high. But with the embrace of radicals like Black Lives Matter by all the leagues, I’m going to make a point of not watching any of it.

Read the entire column here.

 

DNC: Law enforcement agencies tell the city of Milwaukee to forget it

Oh oh.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel  is reporting:

At least 100 law enforcement agencies have withdrawn agreements to send personnel to next month’s Democratic National Convention, some of them citing orders to Milwaukee’s police chief to cease the use of tear gas and pepper spray during demonstrations.

The withdrawals cast doubt on a program to bring about 1,000 police officers from outside agencies to help shore up security for the event, scheduled for the week of Aug 17.

One of the police departments withdrawing is Franklin.

Hey Mayor Barrett, whatcha gonna do now?

MUST-SEE VIDEO: America’s Frontline Doctors offer a totally different perspective on COVID-19

7/28/20: See update below.

Fact check: Houston doctor claims there's 'a cure' for COVID in viral video  - HoustonChronicle.com

Today (Monday) on the steps of the US Supreme Court, America’s Frontline Doctors held a news conference. Physicians from around the country addressed the American people about Covid-19 and the importance of reopening schools and our society. Their “White Coat Summit” is part of a greater effort to extinguish fears surrounding the Chinese coronavirus and remind the public that “99.8 percent of people get through this with little to no progressive or significant disease.”

The first speaker is Dr. Simone Gold, MD, an Emergency Medicine Specialist in Los Angeles, CA with more than 31 years of experience in the medical field.

Please watch it all if you can because it won’t get a ton of media coverage since it doesn’t fit the media (Fauci) template.

UPDATE: As you can see the video has been removed by Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Here is the transcript of the news conference.

Another link to the video.

Today’s highly interesting read (07/27/20): Demoralizing the Police

This highly interesting read (written by a police officer) is a bit shorter than what’s normally posted, but it’s solid. Here’s the excerpt:

Today, the police officer is an object of derision and scorn, viewed not as a remedy to crime and disorder but as a cause of it—at least to an uninformed but influential minority, which includes members of the government and media.

There’s more. Read it all here.

The latest pro-life news (07/27/20)

THIS WEEKLY BLOG POSTED EVERY MONDAY PROMOTES A CULTURE OF LIFE

Don’t miss our closing heartwarming story every week!


From Pro-Life Wisconsin

From WI Right To Life

ALSO:

Sen. Hawley Sets New Pro-Life Standard for Supreme Court Nominees

Pro-life Democrats warn their party as convention nears: Cut the radical pro-abortion platform, or it will cost us in November

Good luck with this: Pastors sign letter urging Democrats to adopt pro-life stance

AND FINALLY, LOVIN’ LIFE…

Thanks for reading!

Lynn Adelman strikes again

Lynn Adelman is a federal judge in the United States District Court for the Eastern district of Wisconsin.  Adelman joined the court in 1997 after being nominated by President Bill Clinton.

More on Adelman after this news video from the summer of 2017 about an outbreak of violence that took place in August of 2016 in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park area.

Someone has been arrested for the 2016 crime but so far that person has not been held responsible. That’s because the case is before the far left Judge Adelman, a criminal’s best friend.

Stephen Ruffin, 31, was charged in 2017 with rioting, arson and arson in connection with a felony for helping set a fire at Big Jim’s Liquor Store, 2161 N. Hopkins St.. on Aug. 14, 2016, that you saw in the above video.

Follow along with the chronology. Ruffin pleaded guilty in November of 2019 to the arson count, that carries a mandatory minimum of five years in prison. The guilty plea was part of an agreement with federal prosecutors. He agreed to the five years.

In March of this year, Ruffin was scheduled to be sentenced. But Adelman refused to impose a mandatory five-year term. His reasoning was unbelievable.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported:

But at his sentencing, U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman noted that Ruffin has no prior criminal record, has kept a good job while out on bond three years and cares for his 7-year-old son.

He said the conduct at issue seemed an aberration. “Am I missing something?” he asked Ruffin’s attorney, Christopher Donovan.

Donovan explained it was a very tough case to resolve and said the government was unwilling to structure the plea deal on the rioting count, which does not carry a minimum mandatory sentence.

“I know this upset the community and caused a lot of problems,” Adelman said, referring to the overall Sherman Park unrest that year, “but do you really need to do it this way?” he asked Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Ladwig.

“Caused a lot of problems?”

The court adjourned for 60 days to work on a different resolution and agreed on a  new sentencing date in May of this year.

Somehow the sentencing got pushed to last week. Ruffin’s attorney asked for an additional 60 days to work on sentencing-related issues. Adelman then postponed sentencing to Sept. 30. Again, the arson occurred in July of 2016. Ruffin was caught on video. He agreed to a five-year sentence. Adelman wouldn’t accept it.

For 20 years Adelman, a died in the wool liberal, served as the state Senator for District 28, my district that includes all of Franklin, a highly conservative area. Adelman had a well-deserved reputation of being far to the left, including having completely soft on crime stances.

State Republicans who were in the minority in the state Senate in the late 1990’s saw a chance to take Adelman’s Senate seat and take back the majority.  The strategy was to get him out of the Senate an onto the federal bench. So they lobbied President Clinton, writing letters asking him to appoint Adelman. It worked. In a special election in 1998 Mary Lazich was victorious and Republicans took control of the state Senate away from Democratic leader Chuck Chvala.

Years later Chvala was charged with numerous felony counts. He pleaded guilty to misconduct in office for directing state employees to work on political campaigns and circumventing election laws by secretly coordinating a phony “independent” campaign committee to help elect vulnerable Democrats. he got nine months in jail. Since Lazich’s 1998 election Republicans have maintained control of state Senate District 28.

One final note about Adelman.  Earlier this year he wrote an article attacking US Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and President Trump. Three complaints were filed under the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act asserting that the publication of the article amounted to judicial misconduct. A court commission disagreed, and Adelman reacted.

“I apologize for any language that I used that could be construed as questioning the integrity of the Chief Justice or any other member of the Court or as expressing a bias against the Republican Party. As the committee recognizes, the issues that I wrote about are complicated and highly contested, but I did not mean for my critique of some judicial decisions to suggest personal criticism of their authors or of individuals or institutions that have embraced them.

“Finally, I want to reaffirm my commitment to the impartial administration of justice in all cases regardless of the nature of the case or the identity of the parties.”

Preposterous. Adelman has had a career-long bias against the Republican Party and is anything but impartial.

My Most Popular Blogs (07/27/20)

Here are my most popular blogs from last week, Sunday – Saturday:

1) Today’s highly interesting read (07/23/20): Four Months of Unprecedented Government Malfeasance

2) UPDATE: Here we go again: Ballpark Commons accused of being too noisy

3) UPDATE: The mask people

4) Happy Anniversary dear Kyla of mine!

5) Photos of the Week (07/19/20)

6) Best Memes of the Week (07/19/20)

7) The latest pro-life news (07/20/20)

8) MAGA sightings (07/19/20)

9) Charlie Daniels and Elvis

10) Friday Night Forgotten Oldie: The ‘it’ was Southern Rock

 

Culinary no-no #662

THERE ARE THOUSANDS AND THOUSANDS OF FOOD BLOGS, BUT ONLY ONE CULINARY NO-NO!

Good gracious it’s hot out there. You’re forgiven if you’re not exactly in the mood for food that sticks to your ribs. How about a nice refreshing salad?

That would be your Cobb de Ville salad with Mixed Lettuce, Turkey Breast, crispy Bacon, Blue Cheese, Hard-boiled Egg, Corn, and Tomatoes with House-made Ranch Dressing. This particular version is served here.

Flo’s V8 Cafe in the Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, California, a Route 66-inspired diner featuring classic American comfort food.

Here’s an important question. Is that salad a ‘meal’? And why does it matter?

The answers are, yes and no, and it matters a lot.

This requires some explaining. Given that the inspiration for this week’s no-no comes from California, the issue is goofy, strange, bizarre. And remember, state and local governments across the country have deemed bars and restaurants public enemy #1

Currently in all of the Golden State, the following are closed:

  • Bars, brewpubs, breweries, and pubs, both indoors and outdoors, unless they are offering sit-down, outdoor dine-in meals. Alcohol can only be sold in the same transaction as a meal.

Statewide, the following must close indoor operations:

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Wineries and tasting rooms

Did you catch that.

Bars, brewpubs, breweries, and pubs, both indoors and outdoors, unless they are offering sit-down, outdoor dine-in meals are closed.  Alcohol can only be sold in the same transaction as a meal.

Places in La La Land are opening and closing about as often as we change our socks. When eateries reopen it’s critical to their bottom lines they sell alcohol.  So they’ve got to serve ‘meals.’ Simple, isn’t it? But this is loony tunes California we’re talking about.

What does California consider a ‘meal’? That’s for the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) to decide. OK, here comes the government-ese.

According to the California ABC:

’Meals’ means the usual assortment of foods commonly ordered at various hours of the day; the service of such food and victuals only as sandwiches or salads shall not be deemed a compliance with this requirement.

The ABC further explains:

Given the tremendous variety of foods available at the many different licensed premises, this definition provides necessary flexibility to look at the totality of the circumstances in determining whether or not the food service provided by a licensee is a legitimate offering of meals in a bona fide manner. In evaluating this, the Department generally looks at the various menu offerings, availability during typical meal hours, and whether the food offered is served in a reasonable quantity and what a reasonable person might consider to be a meal consumed at breakfast, lunch, or dinner. For example, although multiple courses are not required to constitute a meal, in order for the patron to be served a meal there should be a sufficient quantity that it would constitute a main course in a multiple-course dining experience.

C’mon. Take another look at the above Cobb de Ville salad. You mean to tell me that’s not a meal?

….the Department does recognize that many sandwiches and salads are substantial and can constitute legitimate meals.

However…

…the Department looks at the totality of circumstances and generally considers that pre-packaged sandwiches and salads would not typically meet this standard. In addition, the Department will presume that the following, and offerings similar to them, do not meet the meal requirement:

  • Snacks such as pretzels, nuts, popcorn, pickles, and chips
  • Food ordinarily served as appetizers or first courses such as cheese sticks, fried calamari, chicken wings, pizza bites (as opposed to a pizza), egg rolls, pot stickers, flautas, cups of soup, and any small portion of a dish that may constitute a main course when it is not served in a full portion or when it is intended for sharing in small portions
  • Side dishes such as bread, rolls, French fries, onion rings, small salads (green, potato, macaroni, fruit), rice, mashed potatoes, and small portions of vegetables
  • Reheated refrigerated or frozen entrees
  • Desserts

So the Cobb Salad is a meal because the Disney park restaurant offers all kinds of entrees even an over-regulating government bureaucrat would be forced to concede are just that…meals. But that salad just by itself, in a location that only serves salads. No meal.  No way.

Places that concentrate solely on light appetizers, tapas, cheese plates, or street food will probably engage in a losing tug of war  with the California folks in charge of licensing.

Needless to say,  trying to comply is confusing and raises lots and lots of questions.

Yet another example of government making it almost impossible for businesses to open, operate, profit, and survive.

BTW, DisneyLand is closed.

And on the other coast…

CULINARY NO-NO BONUSES

McDonald’s and masks

Biden’s False Claim About McDonald’s

How Pre-Prohibition Drinking Laws Led New Yorkers to Create the World’s Worst Sandwich

ICYMI, Culinary no-no #661

Photos of the Week (07/26/20)

A pictorial week-in-review posted every Sunday.

1) Sandra Bilger, left, and Dustin Moore take a photo in front of the marquee at Wrigley Field before an opening day baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers in Chicago, Friday, July 24, 2020, in Chicago. In a normal year, that would mean a sellout crowd at Wrigley Field and jammed bars surrounding the famed ballpark but in a pandemic-shortened season, it figures to be a different atmosphere. AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

2) The Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers stand for the national anthem before an opening day baseball game Friday, July, 24, 2020, in Chicago. AP Photo/David Banks

3) Cubs executive vice president of sales and marketing Colin Faulkner looks to the field from the Wrigley Rooftop before the Opening Day baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers in Chicago, Friday, July 24, 2020, in Chicago. AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

4) Empty seats are viewed during the first inning of an opening day baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers, Friday, July, 24, 2020, in Chicago. AP Photo/David Banks

5) Fans watch from the rooftops on opening day baseball between the Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers, Friday, July, 24, 2020, in Chicago. The Cubs beat the Brewers, 3-0. AP Photo/David Banks

6) A federal officer pepper sprays a protester in front of the Mark O. Hatfield US Courthouse in Portland, July 20. Photo: Getty Images

7) Federal agents use crowd control munitions to disperse Black Lives Matter protesters at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse, July 19, 2020, in Portland, Oregon. Photo: AP

8) A federal law enforcement officer pushes a mother back during a demonstration against the presence of federal law enforcement officers and racial inequality in Portland, Oregon. Photo: REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs

9) A federal officer pushes back demonstrators at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse in Portland, July 21. Photo: AP

10) Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler reacts after being exposed to tear gas fired by federal officers while attending a protest against police brutality and racial injustice in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse, July 22. Photo: Getty Images

11) An officer from the New York Police Department is seen injured after attempting to detain a protester smearing paint on the Black Lives Matter mural outside of Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, July 18, 2020. Photo: Reuters

12) A Chicago police officer is blocked by activists as he attempts to make an arrest. Photograph: Tyler LaRiviere/AP

13) A worker washes the sidewalk to remove graffiti after police dismantled the “City Hall Autonomous Zone” that was in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, in the Manhattan borough of New York City. Photo: Reuters

14) An Israeli police officer puts his knee on a demonstrator to make an arrest during a protest against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu outside his residence in Jerusalem. Photo: AP

15) U.S. President Donald Trump listens to a question from ABC News reporter Jonathan Karl he holds a coronavirus response news briefing at the White House in Washington. Photo: REUTERS/Leah Millis

16) U.S. President Donald Trump departs after addressing a coronavirus task force news briefing at the White House. Photo: REUTERS/Leah Millis

17) People pay their respects at a makeshift memorial at the base of a mural of civil rights hero John Lewis in Atlanta. Photograph: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

18) Workers hung a black curtain over the Washington, D.C., office door of John Lewis, the Georgia lawmaker and civil-rights leader who died on July 17 at 80. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg News

 

19) White shoes are displayed during a demonstration by Registered Nurses and the National Nurses United (NNU) members, on behalf of healthcare workers nationwide who have passed away due to the coronavirus outbreak, during a protest on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo: REUTERS/Tom Brenner

20) Shoppers who refused to wear masks shop at a Walmart store in Bradford, Pennsylvania. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

21) This photo, taken on July 19, 2020, shows the Guanyinge Temple, a 700-year old temple built on a rock, in the swollen Yangtze River in Wuhan, China. Heavy rains since June have left at least 141 people dead and missing, forced nearly 15 million people to be evacuated from their homes in July alone, and caused billions of dollars in economic losses, according to the government. Photo: AFP / Getty

22) In this photo released by MHI, an H-IIA rocket with United Arab Emirates’ Mars orbiter Hope lifts off from Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima, southern Japan. Photo: AP

23) Qantas cabin crew and ground staff sign the fuselage of a Boeing 747-400 before it leaves Sydney airport for the last time as it retires from service. Photograph: David Gray/Getty Images

24) An elderly couple with health conditions walks along Ipanema beach dressed in homemade spacesuits, made to give themselves extra protection against coronavirus. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

25) Ivanka Trump speaks to a driver in Washington D.C.  as she distributes food boxes to those in need as part of the Farmers to Families food box program. Photograph: Al Drago/Getty Images

26) A man wearing a protective face mask feeds a flock of pigeons at Bolivar Square in Bogota, Colombia, July 21, 2020. Photo: AP

27) A boy, clad in a face mask due to the COVID-19 pandemic, rides in a car with a goat just purchased at an animal market in the city of Hebron in the occupied West Bank. Photo: AFP

28) Movie-goers are spaced apart as they watch a movie in a newly reopened cinema in Hangzhou in eastern China’s Zhejiang province. Photo: AP

29) Socially distanced music fans watch a performance by rock band “Monster Truck” at a drive-in concert held in a parking lot on Toronto’s waterfront, in Toronto, Canada. Photo:  REUTERS/Carlos Osorio

30) A dog rides in the back of a convertible car in Tokyo.  Photograph: Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images

31) Children play in a mud pool during the Online Boryeong Mud Festival at their home during a live streaming event, in Gwangju, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. Photo: REUTERS/Heo Ran