Friday Night Forgotten Oldie: Get Down

Take any average hit record from the past. You know that part in the middle of a song placed between a few verses that often is an instrumental? What’s that called?

You know what I’m talking about. But here’s an example. Chris Montez scored a top five hit with the following song in 1962. We join in progress before that part I’ve described.

Montez has just completed these lyrics:

Hey baby won’t you take a chance?
Say that you’ll let me have this dance
Well, let’s dance, well, let’s dance
We’ll do the twist, the stomp, the mashed potato too
Any old dance that you wanna do
But let’s dance, well let’s dance

Hey, baby, yeah, you thrill me so
Hold me tight, don’t you let me go
But let’s dance, well let’s dance
We’ll do the twist, the stomp, the mashed potato too
Any old dance that you wanna do
But let’s dance, well let’s dance

And to the clever video we go.

Cool organ, right?

Then Montez jumped right back in for the finish that is usually called the OUTRO.

It’s not difficult to figure out there are a few parts to every song.

There’s the INTRO,  the first few measures, usually instrumental.

Think “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” by the Temptations. An unusually lengthy intro, this one had a distinctive bassline plus electric piano, guitar and strings.

You know. It led to the opening lyric. “It was the third of September.”

That’s the INTRO.

Next comes the VERSE, which directly follows after the intro and repeats with different lyrics 1-3 times throughout the song. You got the example above with “Let’s Dance.”

Then in the Montez example you’ve got the organ solo.

AHA!

The solo.  The spot where the singer stops singing and, depending on the type of solo, the band may or may not stop playing while an instrument takes the “spotlight.”

As one musician described on social media, “It’s not that it is important for the singer or the audience, but it is something very iconic to rock music. It is a time when the other musicians show some of their skills, and also so they can get some of the attention too. More often than not, lead singers are the ones who get most of the popularity and are associated with the band’s name.”

The solo.

How does that relate to this week’s oldie?

Festa Italiana Logo

Festa opened today on Milwaukee’s fabulous lakefront.

On Saturday…

Image may contain: 1 person, text

K.C. and the Sunshine Band perform at 9:00 pm on the Harley Davidson stage.

From the group’s Facebook page:

Whose music has been featured at EVERY major sporting event in the world including the Super Bowl, World Series, Conference Championships, The NBA, Collegiate Bowl Games National Championship Games, the NASCAR racing circuit and championships, The World Cup, The Indianapolis 500, The Kentucky Derby, EVERY Holiday Parade include the famous Macys Thanksgiving Day parade and the Tournament of Roses Parade, Political Party Conventions, Presidential Campaigns, and nearly EVERY wedding, confirmation, and bar mitzvah in the world?

Whose music has been featured on more than 200 motion picture film soundtracks?

He has been called the “Founder of the Dance Revolution.”

He is Harry Wayne Casey, better known as the founder and leader of KC and The Sunshine Band.

Here’s their second album.

No photo description available.

KC & THE SUNSHINE BAND was released in 1975. My goodness. It went triple platinum and had four #1 hits. The band  became the first act to score four #1 pop singles in one 12-month period since the Beatles in 1964.

One of the hits from that album was “Get Down Tonight.”

The single that got all the radio play across America was not the album track. It was an extremely shortened version, heavily edited and butchered. That whole middle section was chopped to pieces.

The actual solo? A few seconds.

Many radio listeners never got to hear “the solo” until they bought the album. And they really missed out.

Enjoy. The solo will be quite evident.

Image may contain: 4 people, people on stage and indoor

Back in the 20-hundreds I worked security backstage at the Main Stage at the WI State Fair. I got hooked into moonlighting when I had press credentials, and some of the backstage people whom I had known for a long, long time asked if I would put on a bright yellow Security shirt and give them a hand.

That’s when I met KC. We spoke briefly about his concert at the Republican National Convention (Yes, Casey Finch, better known as KC, is a staunch Republican). Here’s a photo from his Facebook page.

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My job for KC’s State Fair show was all about the steps leading up to the stage, and helping KC’s dancers in big boots make it safely on and off the stage.

One of them who needed and accepted my help that night was Maria De Crescenzo, pictured below at the far right.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing and people dancing

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My goodness how I hated working that night. 🙂

KC spoke this week with John Mercure of WTMJ Radio.

Listen

BONUS

My late mother’s birthday is Saturday.

Here ‘s a Billboard magazine from September of 1946.

If you look on charts listed on pages 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, a certain record by Eddie Howard was very popular at the time.

Mom was the sort of person who never bragged or tried to one up anyone or steal the show. But she loved telling this story.

It had to be the mid to late 1940’s. Mom was working at Omar’s Bakery on Wisconsin Avenue in downtown Milwaukee.

Suddenly one day, a male figure stood at the front window and waved enthusiastically to Mom and the other gals working. The gentleman was unmistakable.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Eddy_Howard_1960.JPG

He was in town appearing at the Riverside. Mom and the others shrieked or screamed or giggled or all of the aforementioned. I think Mom said some cried.

Eddy Howard never stopped inside to buy a cruller or long john. Just as well. He would have received lousy service. All of the women would have passed out.

Mom enjoyed telling that story, though she never wanted any attention directed her way. Whenever she heard “To Each His Own,” Mom seemed to wander off into another land.

 

 

 

One thought on “Friday Night Forgotten Oldie: Get Down

  1. Pingback: My Most Popular Blogs (07/22/19) | This Just In… From Franklin, WI

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