Goodnight everyone, and have a totally Irish weekend!

Every Friday night we smooth our way into the weekend with music, the universal language. These selections demonstrate that despite what is being passed off as art today, there is plenty of really good music available. Come along and enjoy.

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St. Patrick’s Day is this weekend. Never too early to start celebrating.

We’ve got great music, contemporary and traditional to get you in the mood if that’s even necessary. Let’s get started.

Imagine you’re at a St. Patrick’s Day parade.

You can see them marching.

Getting closer. Closer.

You can hear them approaching.

The excitement builds.

You know the music quite well.

Listen.

Listen.

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Now to something more modern.

This band formed in Boston in 1996. Like so many other bands this one started with friends playing in a basement with a style that blended punk rock, Irish folk, rock, and hardcore.

If you’re a Notre Dame football fan you’ll recognize this tune that’s played at kickoff at home games.

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If you love Irish music you’ve heard of Gaelic Storm, a group that’s performed for more  two decades and over 2000 shows. They have topped the Billboard World Chart six times, making appearances at mainstream music festivals, and regularly headlining the largest Irish Festivals across the country. They’ll be at Milwaukee’s Irish Fest on August 16, 17, and 18 this summer.

Oh, and yes, we must mention the group appeared in the blockbuster film, ‘Titanic”  and recorded songs on the movie’s soundtrack. Not a bad resume item.

Here’s a track from their latest album. The Irish have a way with words. The lyrics can be seen after the video.

Now there are those who like to think
We’d be best without the drink
No beer, ale, or frothy pints of porter
So let’s hypothesize
How it would change your lives
If everyone were only drinkin’ water

There’d be no public houses
No bars to take your spouses
No party kegs or cans to celebrate
No deliriums, or visions
Regrettable decisions
No excuses to be coming home too late

So brothers, sisters, it’s time to take a stand
You can pry my beer from my cold dead hand!
Raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down
Yeah raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down

There’d be no swingin’ from the rafters
No bleary morning after
We wouldn’t challenge strangers to a fight
There’d be no singing ’round the fire
With a drunken boozy choir
We’d all be home and tucked up for the night

We’d have no way to wake the dead
We couldn’t wet the baby’s head
Or toast the bachelor or bride-to-be
We’d have no cheery pint to sup
Watching Ireland lose the cup
We’d barely need to go and have a pee

So brothers, sisters, it’s time to take a stand
You can pry my beer from my cold dead hand!
Raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down (drink ’em down!)
Yeah raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down (drink ’em down!)

For every barmaid, every waiter
Both sides of the equator
Would be out of work and livin’ on the dole
The wealth of every nation
Depends upon libations
Beer it seems is worth its weight in gold

Well we’ve assessed the pros and cons
Talled up both the rights and wrongs
The hellfire into which we could be hurled
Now get that pint into your face
You can save the human race
You’re drinking for the future of the world!

So brothers, sisters, it’s time to take a stand
You can pry my beer from my cold dead hand!
Raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down (drink ’em down!)
Yeah raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down (drink ’em down!)
Yeah raise ’em up, raise ’em up and drink ’em down (drink ’em down!)
Well you can pry my beer from my cold dead hand…

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Just about everyone has done their version of the Songbook. Now make way for The Great Irish Songbook.

A new album set to be released in the next month delivers some of the best-loved songs in the Irish tradition. No stranger to Milwaukee’s Irish Fest, the band Dervish reached out to the many artists and then called on each musician to select their most cherished song within Irish folk. Recorded primarily at The Magic Room in Sligo, the album includes  lovelorn ballads, traditional dance music, and even songs sung at funerals.

Here’s a preview of the new album due out on April 12 with Dervish and a bluegrass group from Nashville, the SteelDrivers.

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SteelDrivers at the Turner Hall Ballroom, Milwaukee, WI, February 28, 2019

Sure wish this next group would book a tour here. I know they would have the lakefront at Milwaukee’s Irish Fest jumping.

An Irish family band, the Corrs write their own material and play an assortment of instruments like fiddles, bodhráns, guitars, drums and keyboards.

Here’s a traditional Irish reel.

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That’s it for this week.

Goodnight.

Sleep well.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

We close with the Red Hot Chilli Pipers live from Milwaukee’s Irish Fest in 2014.

From that show, the group’s rendition of Chic’s 1977 disco smash.

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2 thoughts on “Goodnight everyone, and have a totally Irish weekend!

  1. Blue – not green – was the colour traditionally associated with St Patrick
    Though green dominates the celebrations today, it was the colour blue – a shade known as St Patrick’s blue – that was first associated with the saint. The earliest depictions of St Patrick show him in blue garments, and the colour also appears on ancient Irish flags.

    Though green dominates the celebrations today, the colour blue was first associated with St Patrick. The earliest depictions of the saint show him in blue garments, as in this 13th century folio, La Vie des Sains. ( Image ©The British Library Board/Leemage / Bridgeman Images)
    Though green dominates the celebrations today, the colour blue was first associated with St Patrick. The earliest depictions of the saint show him in blue garments, as in the13th century folio, La Vie des Sains. ( Image ©The British Library Board/Leemage / Bridgeman Images)

    In 1541, when King Henry VIII was declared the first English king of Ireland, he used a gold Irish harp on a blue flag for the Irish coat of arms. The blue shade also appears on the 18th-century Order of St Patrick, an order of chivalry created by George III.

    As the blue symbols became more associated with English rule, green grew in popularity as a symbol of rebellion. During the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the shamrock became a symbol of nationalism and the ‘wearing of the green’ on lapels became a regular practice.

    Like

  2. Pingback: My Most Popular Blogs (03/18/19) | This Just In… From Franklin, WI

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