Culinary no-no #597

Culinary no-no began on Father’s Day 2007, a beautiful summer day, when I wrote about grilling brats. And eating brats. And topping those brats. I was inspired by my wife, Jennifer who, in my admittedly unscientific opinion, ruins brats by squirting ketchup on them. Other dining taboos quickly came to mind. The original idea was to take this concept only a few months, till the end of summer and then pull the plug. Then the unexpected happened. People started reading Culinary no-no. Lots of folks. So we keep doing the no-no.

It’s that time of year again!

And yes…

Image result for photo, picture, image, girls selling scout cookies

Who doesn’t like Girl Scout cookies?

Image may contain: text

True. They’re delicious.

However, some folks balk at the price, $4/box around here, $5 in other parts of the country.

One of Kyla’s customers politely took notice and mentioned how he could get all sorts of Oreos or reasonable facsimiles at the grocery store. He still purchased some boxes.

Another potential buyer nicely said no thanks because, you know,  just too fattening.

And I get that people might be tapped out after the holidays.

Social media, of course, has lashed out.

Easy. Go to Walmart. They have Great Value Brand thin mints and chocolate covered peanut butter patties. They are $1.48 per package and you get double the cookies. They taste exactly the same.

I can go to Walmart go in the cookie section and find them

When are they going to stop allowing this scam

Scam? WTH.

Still, the annual ritual sparks a good question: Why, indeed, would you want to plunk down as much as $5 on a box of cookies that certainly appears to shrink in size every year? Let’s ask the organization.

When you buy delicious Girl Scout Cookies, you’re helping power new, unique, and amazing experiences for girls that broaden their worlds, teach them essential life skills, and prepare them to practice a lifetime of leadership.

One hundred percent of the net proceeds from Girl Scout Cookie sales is retained by the originating council and troop to fund activities for girls year-round as well as influential girl-led community projects.

Cookie program revenue is a critical source of funding for Girl Scout councils to deliver essential programs to troops and is often what makes it possible to reach girls in underserved areas and maintain camps and properties.

Additionally, Girl Scout troops can pool their proceeds to pay for necessary supplies, activities, and group travel.

MyLifeAndKids.com wrote, “The Girl Scout Cookie Program is much more than selling cookies. Girls learn 5 valuable skills — goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics — aspects essential to leadership, success, and life.”

WiseBread.com emphaszies, “Girl Scouts are also shown to have a higher success rate in life. In fact, 80% of today’s female business owners were Girl Scouts.”

And finally, this excerpt from a column published this past week:

It was in the 1960s but I can still remember with pride my sash filled with the colorful badges I had earned while in the Girl Scouts. Although I had to work hard to earn them, I also remember gaining a sense of belonging and accomplishment. It was a place to go to find out more about my interests and skills as well as learning how to work as a team, which greatly enriched my life. It was a place to augment my learning and leadership journey.

Girl Scouts is offering the real difference to parents who need their daughters to emerge from childhood and adolescence as leaders, ready to develop their minds, think for themselves, and exceed in our modern world.

Being a Girl Scout has made a significant difference in my life as a leader, and it can for your girl too.

Who said that?

Read the entire piece from the BizTimes.

CULINARY NO-NO BONUSES

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NCAA Champion Hits Back at Media for Criticizing Trump’s Big Mac Buffet

Big Dairy Is About to Flood America’s School Lunches With Milk

The pegan diet

 

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