Today’s highly interesting read (12/07/17): On a Sunday Morning

More than 90 ships were anchored at Pearl Harbor. The primary targets were the eight battleships in Battleship Row.

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One thing that this country needs and needs badly is an all-out understanding that in unity is strength, and that in the face of peril, America must stand as one man with the government for its defense. So the war with Japan will unite America and bring our folks to their senses.

Every workingman, every congressman and every citizen must place his home and his country ahead of everything else, for he cannot have a home without a country and he must be prepared to make sacrifices and to fight, if need be, to save America from the horde of savages that afflict Europe and Asia, that are following the heathenish leaders that have a tremendous grip on the people of the world, their ideology and their economic condition.
The Wilson Times, December 8, 1941

Today’s read is a column written a year ago in the City Journal:

Perhaps the most inspiring moment of the day on the American side was the sight of the USS Nevada, though damaged by bombs, pulling out of the harbor, the only ship from Battleship Row to get moving. The Nevada managed to shoot down a handful of Japanese planes, but, at risk of sinking, it was grounded off an area known as Hospital Point. Many, like Seaman Thomas Malmin, who was aboard, recalled seeing, through clouds of black smoke, the ship’s flag flying on the fantail. Malmin “recalled that ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ was written under similar conditions, and he felt the glow of living the same experience,” Lord wrote. “He understood better the words of Francis Scott Key.”

Read the entire column here.

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