Goodnight everyone, and have a weekend Dad would be proud of!

“Dad, what do old records sound like?”

After a few technical glitches I get it working, then ask the kids – Cathleen and her brothers Sean and Tommy (aged eight and four) to pick a record. They go for Ornette Coleman’s Free Jazz – ha ha, no not really, it’s The Jungle Book album. The kids are not used to being able to see the technology in action. Although normally quite tech savvy, when faced with a revolving plate, a stick with wire and a needle, they are flummoxed. They watch, fascinated, as the needle comes down, there’s that scratchy sound that seems alien yet so comfortingly familiar – and once the cue to for me to enter an altered state of consciousness. Then the room is full of music.
Tim Bradford, the Guardian

Every Friday night we smooth our way into the weekend with music, the universal language. These selections demonstrate that despite what is being passed off as art today, there is plenty of really good music available. Come along and enjoy.

“It sat in my parents’ dining room for 30 years or more: an old oak stereo console with large speakers concealed by green fabric. It filled my childhood with a harmony and clarity we could use lots more of about now.”

Columnist Tom Purcell wrote that in a column that’s excerpted from his book, “Misadventures of a 1970’s Childhood.”

One of my favorite Goodnight blogs to work on is when i delve into my father’s old album collection. Generally I do that around Father’s Day, but my Dad’s birthday is tomorrow, so why not. Let’s have some fun!

In the late 60’s we’d watch Tom Jones’ Friday night variety show. A fellow singer from across the ocean was also wooing women, making hit records, and hosting his own show as well.

Dad liked Tom Jones, but said he yelled, unlike this guy. dad liked his singing style a lot more.

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I was fortunate. I had a very cool Dad. He liked the Beatles and many of the young pop stars.

A neighbor friend once expressed his disgust with the Fab Four and I’ll never forget Dad’s calm response.

“They’ve given a lot of kids a start with their guitars.”

Dad purchased this next album more so for the lush orchestral arrangements by George Martin. His favorite on the entire album…

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Did I mention Dad was cool? Well so was Mom. How cool? Dad didn’t purchase this next album. Mom did for him.

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Quite possibly the most famous album cover of all-time.

This next medley contains only one piece from that album (“A Taste of Honey”), but the tunes are very memorable.

Image result for image, photo, whipped cream and other delights

Can’t do a blog like this without featuring something from the Big Band era. Dad was a WWII Veteran and a big fan of Glenn Miller.

Image result for image, , the glenn miller story, album

That’s it for this week.

Goodnight.

Sleep well.

Hope you have a weekend filled with great memories.

West Allis’ Liberace often joked in concert that yes, there men in his audience. That included my dad and my Uncle Claude.

When I was working at what was then called the Performing Arts center I managed to get my Mom and Dad and my Uncle Claude and Aunt Rose great seats to see Liberace. My aunt and uncle used to watch Liberace when he played in the Green Room in the Pfister Hotel. In those early days of Liberace’s career the flashy pianist who would be nicknamed Mr. Showmanship wore a simple suit and tie, but he did plant a candelabra on his piano.

In an interview with Bob Edwards of National Public Radio Liberace who enraged purists said he took classical music and removed all the boring parts. That was just fine with Dad.

For what turned out to be his last Christmas I bought Dad an album of Liberace live in concert. Here’s one of the tracks.

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